Improvement of Short-Term Climate Prediction with Indirect Soil Variables Assimilation in China

Improvement of Short-Term Climate Prediction with Indirect Soil Variables Assimilation in China AbstractShort-term climate prediction based on a regional climate dynamical model heavily depends on atmospheric forcing and initial soil moisture state. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with different nudging schemes is used for approximate 2-yr simulations for investigating the importance of soil variables in seasonal temperature and precipitation simulations. The results show that the improvement of seasonal climate simulation (precipitation and air temperature) is more evident in the experiment of assimilating both soil and atmospheric variables than that in the experiments of assimilating atmospheric variables only. Further investigation of the impact of indirectly assimilating soil moisture on precipitation prediction with an indirect soil nudging (ISN) scheme shows that the precipitation reproducibility in summer is better than that in winter, and the effect of ISN is particularly prominent in the region where seasonal precipitation exceeds 200 mm. Moreover, statistical results also illustrate that initial soil moisture plays a crucial role in seasonal precipitation forecasts because of its slowly evolving nature, and its effect is more distinct in semiarid and semihumid regions than in arid and humid regions. The effects of indirectly assimilating soil moisture on precipitation can last two and three months in semiarid and semihumid areas, respectively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Climate American Meteorological Society

Improvement of Short-Term Climate Prediction with Indirect Soil Variables Assimilation in China

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0442
D.O.I.
10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0210.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractShort-term climate prediction based on a regional climate dynamical model heavily depends on atmospheric forcing and initial soil moisture state. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with different nudging schemes is used for approximate 2-yr simulations for investigating the importance of soil variables in seasonal temperature and precipitation simulations. The results show that the improvement of seasonal climate simulation (precipitation and air temperature) is more evident in the experiment of assimilating both soil and atmospheric variables than that in the experiments of assimilating atmospheric variables only. Further investigation of the impact of indirectly assimilating soil moisture on precipitation prediction with an indirect soil nudging (ISN) scheme shows that the precipitation reproducibility in summer is better than that in winter, and the effect of ISN is particularly prominent in the region where seasonal precipitation exceeds 200 mm. Moreover, statistical results also illustrate that initial soil moisture plays a crucial role in seasonal precipitation forecasts because of its slowly evolving nature, and its effect is more distinct in semiarid and semihumid regions than in arid and humid regions. The effects of indirectly assimilating soil moisture on precipitation can last two and three months in semiarid and semihumid areas, respectively.

Journal

Journal of ClimateAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 3, 2018

References

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