Impact of Tropical Deforestation and Forest Degradation on Precipitation over Borneo Island

Impact of Tropical Deforestation and Forest Degradation on Precipitation over Borneo Island AbstractSoutheast Asian tropical rain forests in the Maritime Continent are among the most important biomes in terms of global and regional water cycling. How land use and land cover change (LULCC) relating to deforestation and forest degradation alter the local hydroclimate over the island of Borneo is examined using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with an appropriate land surface model for describing the influence of changes in the vegetation status on the atmosphere. The model was validated against precipitation data from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite 3B42 measurements. A main novelty in this analysis is that the diurnal cycle of precipitation over the island, which is a dominant climatic characteristic of the Maritime Continent, was successfully reproduced. To clarify the impact of the LULCC on the precipitation regimes over the island, numerical experiments were performed with the model that demonstrated the following. Deforestation that generates high albedo areas, such as bare lands, would induce a reduction in precipitation because of reductions in evapotranspiration, convection, and horizontal atmospheric moisture inflow. On the other hand, a decrease in evapotranspiration efficiency without changing the surface albedo could increase precipitation due to an increase in convection and horizontal atmospheric moisture inflow in compensation for the decrease in evapotranspiration. In detail, on the Maritime Continent, through changes in the land surface heating process and land–sea breeze circulation, the LULCC would impact the amplitude of the diurnal precipitation cycle in each region as defined according to the distance from the coast, resulting in changes in the precipitation regimes over the island. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Hydrometeorology American Meteorological Society

Impact of Tropical Deforestation and Forest Degradation on Precipitation over Borneo Island

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/impact-of-tropical-deforestation-and-forest-degradation-on-Eb35agFtli
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1525-7541
D.O.I.
10.1175/JHM-D-17-0008.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractSoutheast Asian tropical rain forests in the Maritime Continent are among the most important biomes in terms of global and regional water cycling. How land use and land cover change (LULCC) relating to deforestation and forest degradation alter the local hydroclimate over the island of Borneo is examined using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with an appropriate land surface model for describing the influence of changes in the vegetation status on the atmosphere. The model was validated against precipitation data from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite 3B42 measurements. A main novelty in this analysis is that the diurnal cycle of precipitation over the island, which is a dominant climatic characteristic of the Maritime Continent, was successfully reproduced. To clarify the impact of the LULCC on the precipitation regimes over the island, numerical experiments were performed with the model that demonstrated the following. Deforestation that generates high albedo areas, such as bare lands, would induce a reduction in precipitation because of reductions in evapotranspiration, convection, and horizontal atmospheric moisture inflow. On the other hand, a decrease in evapotranspiration efficiency without changing the surface albedo could increase precipitation due to an increase in convection and horizontal atmospheric moisture inflow in compensation for the decrease in evapotranspiration. In detail, on the Maritime Continent, through changes in the land surface heating process and land–sea breeze circulation, the LULCC would impact the amplitude of the diurnal precipitation cycle in each region as defined according to the distance from the coast, resulting in changes in the precipitation regimes over the island.

Journal

Journal of HydrometeorologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 8, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off