Hong Kong Meteorological Society Formed

Hong Kong Meteorological Society Formed special news feature The Hong Kong Meteorological Society was recently established in an effort to promote science and its applications in Hong Kong. The society, which was registered on 9 December 1988, is seeking interested scientists to join the membership and promote its goals. The main objectives of the society include developing and disseminating knowledge of meteorology and related oceanic, hydrologic, and geographic sciences. The society will promote the advancement of profes- sional applications of meteorology, the understanding of weather among the public, and an appreciation of the value of meteorology and its applications. Collaboration among members of the society, individuals, and corporate or unicorporate bodies who share the society's interests is sought to achieve these goals. The office bearers of the Hong Kong Meteorological Society session 1989-90 are Patrick P. Sham, chairman; William J. Kyle, vice-chairman; Y. K. Chan, honorary secretary; S. I. Hsu, honorary treasurer; Fred J. Hick- ernell, Y. S. Li, and S. L. Hung, committee members; John C. T. Wu, honorary auditor; and Venus Choy, honorary legal advisor. Applications are now being accepted. Categories of membership are fellow, a meteorologist or scholar with research experience in meteorology; associate member, any person with an interest in meteorology; student member, a student attending any of the universities or post-secondary colleges in Hong Kong wh o is interested in meteorology; and corresponding member, a meteorologist residing outside Hong Kong. The entrance fee has been waived for admission in 1989; information about admission following 1989 is available from the society. For further information or an application form, write Y. K. Chan, Hong Kong Meteorological Society, c/o Royal Observatory Hong Kong, 134A Nathan Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong. • news and notes global climate warming was initiated with the partic- U.S./USSR Earth Sciences Group ipation of the U.S. Geological Survey, NASA's God- Identifies Areas of Cooperation dard Space Flight Center, and the Institute of The U.S./USSR Joint Working Group on Earth Sci- Geography of the USSR Academy of Sciences. The ences held its second meeting in Washington DC two sides will prepare experimental maps, compiled 17-21 July 1989. The group agreed to cooperate in from satellite remote sensing imagery, to document two subsatellite experiments related to land-atmo- changes that have occurred and are occurring in the sphere interactions, and agreed to cooperate in stud- coastal regions of Antarctica. ies of changes in the earth's cryosphere in response Both sides noted with satisfaction the progress to global climate warming. achieved in the preparation of the U.S. Total Ozone The two subsatellite experiments call for nine Soviet Mapping Spectrometer to be flown on the Soviet scientists to provide ground-based and airborne ex- Meteor 3 spacecraft in the second half of 1991. periments and to participate in the United States first Both sides expressed support for continued inter- field experiment in the International Satellite Land action between the U.S. and USSR in oceanographic Surface Climatology Project in Kansas during the research programs related to understanding ocean summer of 1989. processes of importance in global change. Joint sci- Ten U.S. Scientists will provide experiments and entific meetings are planned to discuss biospheric participate in a similar experiment near Kursk in the dynamics and problems of desertification and forest USSR in 1991. The experiments will include the stress. Additional information exchanges on trace exchange of Soviet and U.S. satellite data on these gases and research in ocean remote sensing are sites. expected to lead to joint activities at subsequent A cooperative project to study changes that are meetings. occuring in the earth's cryosphere in response to 1300 Vol. 70, No. 10, October 1989 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

Hong Kong Meteorological Society Formed

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-70.10.1300a
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Abstract

special news feature The Hong Kong Meteorological Society was recently established in an effort to promote science and its applications in Hong Kong. The society, which was registered on 9 December 1988, is seeking interested scientists to join the membership and promote its goals. The main objectives of the society include developing and disseminating knowledge of meteorology and related oceanic, hydrologic, and geographic sciences. The society will promote the advancement of profes- sional applications of meteorology, the understanding of weather among the public, and an appreciation of the value of meteorology and its applications. Collaboration among members of the society, individuals, and corporate or unicorporate bodies who share the society's interests is sought to achieve these goals. The office bearers of the Hong Kong Meteorological Society session 1989-90 are Patrick P. Sham, chairman; William J. Kyle, vice-chairman; Y. K. Chan, honorary secretary; S. I. Hsu, honorary treasurer; Fred J. Hick- ernell, Y. S. Li, and S. L. Hung, committee members; John C. T. Wu, honorary auditor; and Venus Choy, honorary legal advisor. Applications are now being accepted. Categories of membership are fellow, a meteorologist or scholar with research experience in meteorology; associate member, any person with an interest in meteorology; student member, a student attending any of the universities or post-secondary colleges in Hong Kong wh o is interested in meteorology; and corresponding member, a meteorologist residing outside Hong Kong. The entrance fee has been waived for admission in 1989; information about admission following 1989 is available from the society. For further information or an application form, write Y. K. Chan, Hong Kong Meteorological Society, c/o Royal Observatory Hong Kong, 134A Nathan Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong. • news and notes global climate warming was initiated with the partic- U.S./USSR Earth Sciences Group ipation of the U.S. Geological Survey, NASA's God- Identifies Areas of Cooperation dard Space Flight Center, and the Institute of The U.S./USSR Joint Working Group on Earth Sci- Geography of the USSR Academy of Sciences. The ences held its second meeting in Washington DC two sides will prepare experimental maps, compiled 17-21 July 1989. The group agreed to cooperate in from satellite remote sensing imagery, to document two subsatellite experiments related to land-atmo- changes that have occurred and are occurring in the sphere interactions, and agreed to cooperate in stud- coastal regions of Antarctica. ies of changes in the earth's cryosphere in response Both sides noted with satisfaction the progress to global climate warming. achieved in the preparation of the U.S. Total Ozone The two subsatellite experiments call for nine Soviet Mapping Spectrometer to be flown on the Soviet scientists to provide ground-based and airborne ex- Meteor 3 spacecraft in the second half of 1991. periments and to participate in the United States first Both sides expressed support for continued inter- field experiment in the International Satellite Land action between the U.S. and USSR in oceanographic Surface Climatology Project in Kansas during the research programs related to understanding ocean summer of 1989. processes of importance in global change. Joint sci- Ten U.S. Scientists will provide experiments and entific meetings are planned to discuss biospheric participate in a similar experiment near Kursk in the dynamics and problems of desertification and forest USSR in 1991. The experiments will include the stress. Additional information exchanges on trace exchange of Soviet and U.S. satellite data on these gases and research in ocean remote sensing are sites. expected to lead to joint activities at subsequent A cooperative project to study changes that are meetings. occuring in the earth's cryosphere in response to 1300 Vol. 70, No. 10, October 1989

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 1, 1989

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