Gradients of Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity Controlled by Local Urban Land-Use Intensity in Boston

Gradients of Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity Controlled by Local Urban Land-Use Intensity in... AbstractCities are home to the majority of humanity. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that control urban climates has substantial societal importance to a variety of sectors, including public health and energy management. In this study, data from an urban sensor network (25 stations) and moderate-resolution remote sensing were used to explore how spatial variation in near-surface air temperature Ta, vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and land surface temperature (LST) depend on local variations in urban land use, both diurnally and seasonally, in the Boston, Massachusetts, metropolitan area. Positive correlations were observed between the amount of local impervious surface area (ISA) and both Ta and VPD. Heat-island effects peaked during the growing-season nighttime, when mean Ta and VPD increased by up to 0.02°C and 0.008 kPa, respectively, per unit ISA. Air temperature and VPD were strongly coupled, but their relationship exhibited significant diurnal hysteresis during the growing season, with changes in VPD generally preceding changes in Ta. Over 79% of the urban–rural difference in VPD was explained by differences in near-surface atmospheric water content, which the authors attribute to reduced evapotranspiration from lower canopy cover in Boston’s urban core. Changes in daytime heat-island intensity were mediated by seasonal feedbacks between vegetation transpiration and VPD forcing. Differences between LST and Ta showed weaker coupling in highly urbanized areas than in rural areas, with summertime surface-urban-heat-island intensity (based on LST) being up to 14°C higher than corresponding urban–rural differences in Ta. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology American Meteorological Society

Gradients of Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity Controlled by Local Urban Land-Use Intensity in Boston

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/gradients-of-atmospheric-temperature-and-humidity-controlled-by-local-5Kzv0udIp0
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1558-8432
eISSN
1558-8432
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0325.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractCities are home to the majority of humanity. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that control urban climates has substantial societal importance to a variety of sectors, including public health and energy management. In this study, data from an urban sensor network (25 stations) and moderate-resolution remote sensing were used to explore how spatial variation in near-surface air temperature Ta, vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and land surface temperature (LST) depend on local variations in urban land use, both diurnally and seasonally, in the Boston, Massachusetts, metropolitan area. Positive correlations were observed between the amount of local impervious surface area (ISA) and both Ta and VPD. Heat-island effects peaked during the growing-season nighttime, when mean Ta and VPD increased by up to 0.02°C and 0.008 kPa, respectively, per unit ISA. Air temperature and VPD were strongly coupled, but their relationship exhibited significant diurnal hysteresis during the growing season, with changes in VPD generally preceding changes in Ta. Over 79% of the urban–rural difference in VPD was explained by differences in near-surface atmospheric water content, which the authors attribute to reduced evapotranspiration from lower canopy cover in Boston’s urban core. Changes in daytime heat-island intensity were mediated by seasonal feedbacks between vegetation transpiration and VPD forcing. Differences between LST and Ta showed weaker coupling in highly urbanized areas than in rural areas, with summertime surface-urban-heat-island intensity (based on LST) being up to 14°C higher than corresponding urban–rural differences in Ta.

Journal

Journal of Applied Meteorology and ClimatologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 26, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial