From Headquarters

From Headquarters Computer Usage among AMS Members-Preliminary Results of the Dues Statement Sturvey The reverse side of the 1996 AMS dues statement Word for Mac at 11%, LaTeX at 4%, and TeX at 2% contained a series of questions pertaining to at work (there were 9% who responded "other" on this ques- and at home computer use. While dues statements are tion and 8% who did not answer it). still coming in at Headquarters, enough have been pro- When asked if they have a CD-ROM drive, 60% cessed to allow some preliminary results to be reported responded that they had one at work, while 37% re- on some aspects of the survey. We will report here sponded that they had one at home. only on some of the questions related to computer Not surprisingly, 75% of the respondents indicated usage by AMS members. Of the 4811 surveys pro- that they have World Wide Web access. When asked cessed, 89% said that they use a computer regularly what level of access they had to the Internet, 43% re- at work or home. All the additional results presented sponded that they had full node access, while 22% here are for this group of respondents. indicated access through a dial-up connection (includ- The questionnaire allowed respondents to list up to ing services such as Compuserve, America On-Line, three operating systems they use routinely from most etc.), and 10% indicated access through a PPP/SLP used to least used. Windows was the most common account. Only 15% indicated no access to the Inter- first choice, at 40% of the responses, following by net (though 9% did not respond to this question). In- UNIX and DOS, each with 23%, and Mac at 10% (the terestingly, when asked what level of Internet access remaining percentage indicated "other" or did not they expect to have a year from now, the percentages answer this question). A similar question asked for for each type of access remained almost identical, with the most commonly used word processing software. the only real deviations being that only 8% responded Here WordPerfect was the top choice with 41% of the that they expected to have no access while 17% failed responses, followed by Word for Windows at 25%, to respond. Four Named to Serve on First Editorial Board of Eart h Interactions Five societies, spanning the earth science disciplines, have collaborated to develop the new, peer- reviewed, high-quality scholarly all-electronic journal, Earth Interactions. The collaborating societies are the American Meteorological Society (AMS), American Geophysi- cal Union (AGU), Association of American Geographers (AAG), The Oceanography Society, and Eco- logical Society of America, with AMS, AGU, and AAG serving as copublishers. A volunteer scientific editor appointed by each of the copublishing societies, plus a chief editor, will compose the Earth Interactions Editorial Board. Eric Barron of the Earth System Science Center at the Pennsylvania State University was chosen by all of the societies to serve as chief editor of the electronic publication. The remainder of the Editorial Board will be filled by AMS appointee Kevin Trenberth of the Climate and Global Dynamics Division at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, AGU appointee David T. Sandwell of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and AAG appointee George F. Hepner of the Department of Geography at the University of Utah. An article containing detailed information about the Earth Interactions Editorial Board and submis- sion information was recently published in EOS, AGU's membership publication. The article appeared in volume 77, number 6, page 49. A complete summary of the Earth Interactions project is posted on the AMS home page at http://www.ametsoc.org/AMS in the publications department page. 58 0 Vol. 77, No. 3, March 7 99 6 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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American Meteorological Society
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ISSN
1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-77.3.580
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Abstract

Computer Usage among AMS Members-Preliminary Results of the Dues Statement Sturvey The reverse side of the 1996 AMS dues statement Word for Mac at 11%, LaTeX at 4%, and TeX at 2% contained a series of questions pertaining to at work (there were 9% who responded "other" on this ques- and at home computer use. While dues statements are tion and 8% who did not answer it). still coming in at Headquarters, enough have been pro- When asked if they have a CD-ROM drive, 60% cessed to allow some preliminary results to be reported responded that they had one at work, while 37% re- on some aspects of the survey. We will report here sponded that they had one at home. only on some of the questions related to computer Not surprisingly, 75% of the respondents indicated usage by AMS members. Of the 4811 surveys pro- that they have World Wide Web access. When asked cessed, 89% said that they use a computer regularly what level of access they had to the Internet, 43% re- at work or home. All the additional results presented sponded that they had full node access, while 22% here are for this group of respondents. indicated access through a dial-up connection (includ- The questionnaire allowed respondents to list up to ing services such as Compuserve, America On-Line, three operating systems they use routinely from most etc.), and 10% indicated access through a PPP/SLP used to least used. Windows was the most common account. Only 15% indicated no access to the Inter- first choice, at 40% of the responses, following by net (though 9% did not respond to this question). In- UNIX and DOS, each with 23%, and Mac at 10% (the terestingly, when asked what level of Internet access remaining percentage indicated "other" or did not they expect to have a year from now, the percentages answer this question). A similar question asked for for each type of access remained almost identical, with the most commonly used word processing software. the only real deviations being that only 8% responded Here WordPerfect was the top choice with 41% of the that they expected to have no access while 17% failed responses, followed by Word for Windows at 25%, to respond. Four Named to Serve on First Editorial Board of Eart h Interactions Five societies, spanning the earth science disciplines, have collaborated to develop the new, peer- reviewed, high-quality scholarly all-electronic journal, Earth Interactions. The collaborating societies are the American Meteorological Society (AMS), American Geophysi- cal Union (AGU), Association of American Geographers (AAG), The Oceanography Society, and Eco- logical Society of America, with AMS, AGU, and AAG serving as copublishers. A volunteer scientific editor appointed by each of the copublishing societies, plus a chief editor, will compose the Earth Interactions Editorial Board. Eric Barron of the Earth System Science Center at the Pennsylvania State University was chosen by all of the societies to serve as chief editor of the electronic publication. The remainder of the Editorial Board will be filled by AMS appointee Kevin Trenberth of the Climate and Global Dynamics Division at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, AGU appointee David T. Sandwell of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and AAG appointee George F. Hepner of the Department of Geography at the University of Utah. An article containing detailed information about the Earth Interactions Editorial Board and submis- sion information was recently published in EOS, AGU's membership publication. The article appeared in volume 77, number 6, page 49. A complete summary of the Earth Interactions project is posted on the AMS home page at http://www.ametsoc.org/AMS in the publications department page. 58 0 Vol. 77, No. 3, March 7 99 6

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1996

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