Forecasting tropical cyclone eye formation and dissipation in infrared imagery

Forecasting tropical cyclone eye formation and dissipation in infrared imagery AbstractThe development of an infrared (IR, specifically near 11 μm) eye probability forecast scheme for tropical cyclones is described. The scheme was developed from an eye detection algorithm that used a linear discriminant analysis technique to determine the probability of an eye existing in any given IR image given information about the storm center, motion and latitude. Logistic regression is used for the model development and predictors were selected from routine information about the current storm (e.g., current intensity, etc.), forecast environmental factors (e.g., wind shear, oceanic heat content, etc.), and patterns/information (e.g., convective organization, tropical cyclone size, etc.) extracted from the current IR image. Forecasts were created for 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36-h forecast leads.Forecasts were developed using eye existence probabilities from North Atlantic tropical cyclone cases (1996-2014) and a combined North Atlantic, and North Pacific (i.e., Northern Hemisphere) sample. The performance of North Atlantic – based forecasts, tested using independent East Pacific tropical cyclone cases (1996-2014), shows that the forecasts are skillful versus persistence at 12- 36 h, and skillful versus climatology at 6 - 36 h. Examining the reliability and calibration of those forecasts show that calibration and reliability of the forecasts is good for 6-18 hours, but forecasts become a little overconfident at longer lead times. The forecasts also appear unbiased. The small differences between Atlantic and Northern Hemisphere formulations are discussed. Finally, and remarkably, there are indications that smaller TCs are more prone to form eye features in all TC areas examined. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Weather and Forecasting American Meteorological Society

Forecasting tropical cyclone eye formation and dissipation in infrared imagery

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0434
D.O.I.
10.1175/WAF-D-17-0037.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe development of an infrared (IR, specifically near 11 μm) eye probability forecast scheme for tropical cyclones is described. The scheme was developed from an eye detection algorithm that used a linear discriminant analysis technique to determine the probability of an eye existing in any given IR image given information about the storm center, motion and latitude. Logistic regression is used for the model development and predictors were selected from routine information about the current storm (e.g., current intensity, etc.), forecast environmental factors (e.g., wind shear, oceanic heat content, etc.), and patterns/information (e.g., convective organization, tropical cyclone size, etc.) extracted from the current IR image. Forecasts were created for 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36-h forecast leads.Forecasts were developed using eye existence probabilities from North Atlantic tropical cyclone cases (1996-2014) and a combined North Atlantic, and North Pacific (i.e., Northern Hemisphere) sample. The performance of North Atlantic – based forecasts, tested using independent East Pacific tropical cyclone cases (1996-2014), shows that the forecasts are skillful versus persistence at 12- 36 h, and skillful versus climatology at 6 - 36 h. Examining the reliability and calibration of those forecasts show that calibration and reliability of the forecasts is good for 6-18 hours, but forecasts become a little overconfident at longer lead times. The forecasts also appear unbiased. The small differences between Atlantic and Northern Hemisphere formulations are discussed. Finally, and remarkably, there are indications that smaller TCs are more prone to form eye features in all TC areas examined.

Journal

Weather and ForecastingAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 3, 2017

References

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