Evaluation of satellite and reanalysis wind products with in situ Wave Glider wind observations in the Southern Ocean

Evaluation of satellite and reanalysis wind products with in situ Wave Glider wind observations... AbstractSurface ocean wind datasets are required to be of high spatial and temporal resolution and high precision to accurately force or be assimilated into coupled atmosphere-ocean numerical models and understand ocean-atmospheric processes. In situ observed sea surface winds from the Southern Ocean are scarce and consequently the validity of simulation models is often questionable. Multiple wind data products were compared to the first known high resolution in situ measurements of wind speed from Wave Glider (WG) deployments in the Southern Ocean with the intent to determine which blended satellite or reanalysis product best represents the magnitude and variability of the observed wind field. Results show that the ECMWF reanalysis product is the most accurate in representing the temporal variability of winds, exhibiting consistently higher correlation coefficients with in situ data across all wind speed categories. However, the NCEP-DOE AMIP Reanalysis-2 product matches in situ trends of deviation from the mean and performs best in depicting the mean wind state, especially during high wind states. The ECMWF product also leads to smaller differences in wind speeds from the in situ data, while CFSv2 showed slightly higher biases and a greater RMSE. The SW product consistently performed poorly at representing the mean or wind stress variability compared to those observed by the WG. Overall, the study shows autonomous surface vehicles provide valuable observations by which to validate, understand and potentially assist in correcting satellite/reanalysis products, particularly in remote regions, where few in situ estimates exist. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology American Meteorological Society

Evaluation of satellite and reanalysis wind products with in situ Wave Glider wind observations in the Southern Ocean

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0426
D.O.I.
10.1175/JTECH-D-17-0079.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractSurface ocean wind datasets are required to be of high spatial and temporal resolution and high precision to accurately force or be assimilated into coupled atmosphere-ocean numerical models and understand ocean-atmospheric processes. In situ observed sea surface winds from the Southern Ocean are scarce and consequently the validity of simulation models is often questionable. Multiple wind data products were compared to the first known high resolution in situ measurements of wind speed from Wave Glider (WG) deployments in the Southern Ocean with the intent to determine which blended satellite or reanalysis product best represents the magnitude and variability of the observed wind field. Results show that the ECMWF reanalysis product is the most accurate in representing the temporal variability of winds, exhibiting consistently higher correlation coefficients with in situ data across all wind speed categories. However, the NCEP-DOE AMIP Reanalysis-2 product matches in situ trends of deviation from the mean and performs best in depicting the mean wind state, especially during high wind states. The ECMWF product also leads to smaller differences in wind speeds from the in situ data, while CFSv2 showed slightly higher biases and a greater RMSE. The SW product consistently performed poorly at representing the mean or wind stress variability compared to those observed by the WG. Overall, the study shows autonomous surface vehicles provide valuable observations by which to validate, understand and potentially assist in correcting satellite/reanalysis products, particularly in remote regions, where few in situ estimates exist.

Journal

Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic TechnologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Aug 24, 2017

References

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