Evaluating CFSv2 Subseasonal Forecast Skill with an Emphasis on Tropical Convection

Evaluating CFSv2 Subseasonal Forecast Skill with an Emphasis on Tropical Convection AbstractThis study examines the subseasonal predictive skill of CFSv2, focusing on the spatial and temporal distributions of error for large-scale atmospheric variables and the realism of simulated tropical convection. Errors in a 4-member CFSv2 ensemble forecast saturate at lead times of approximately 3 weeks for 500-hPa geopotential height and 5 weeks for 200-hPa velocity potential. Forecast errors exceed those of climatology at lead times beyond 2 weeks. Sea surface temperature, which evolves more slowly than atmospheric fields, maintains skill over climatology through the first month. Spatial patterns of error are robust across lead times and temporal averaging periods, increasing in amplitude as lead time increases and temporal averaging period decreases. Several significant biases were found in the CFSv2 reforecasts, such as too little convection over tropical land and excessive convection over the ocean. The realism of simulated tropical convection and associated teleconnections degrades with forecast lead time. Large-scale tropical convection in CFSv2 is more stationary than observed. Forecast MJOs propagate eastward too slowly and those initiated over the Indian Ocean have trouble traversing beyond the Maritime Continent. The total variability of simulated propagating convection is concentrated at lower frequencies compared to observed convection, and is more fully described by a red spectrum, indicating weak representation of convectively coupled waves. These flaws in simulated tropical convection, which could be tied to problems with convective parameterization and associated mean state biases, affect atmospheric teleconnections and may degrade extended global forecast skill. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Monthly Weather Review American Meteorological Society

Evaluating CFSv2 Subseasonal Forecast Skill with an Emphasis on Tropical Convection

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0493
D.O.I.
10.1175/MWR-D-17-0109.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis study examines the subseasonal predictive skill of CFSv2, focusing on the spatial and temporal distributions of error for large-scale atmospheric variables and the realism of simulated tropical convection. Errors in a 4-member CFSv2 ensemble forecast saturate at lead times of approximately 3 weeks for 500-hPa geopotential height and 5 weeks for 200-hPa velocity potential. Forecast errors exceed those of climatology at lead times beyond 2 weeks. Sea surface temperature, which evolves more slowly than atmospheric fields, maintains skill over climatology through the first month. Spatial patterns of error are robust across lead times and temporal averaging periods, increasing in amplitude as lead time increases and temporal averaging period decreases. Several significant biases were found in the CFSv2 reforecasts, such as too little convection over tropical land and excessive convection over the ocean. The realism of simulated tropical convection and associated teleconnections degrades with forecast lead time. Large-scale tropical convection in CFSv2 is more stationary than observed. Forecast MJOs propagate eastward too slowly and those initiated over the Indian Ocean have trouble traversing beyond the Maritime Continent. The total variability of simulated propagating convection is concentrated at lower frequencies compared to observed convection, and is more fully described by a red spectrum, indicating weak representation of convectively coupled waves. These flaws in simulated tropical convection, which could be tied to problems with convective parameterization and associated mean state biases, affect atmospheric teleconnections and may degrade extended global forecast skill.

Journal

Monthly Weather ReviewAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 24, 2017

References

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