Effect of Enhanced Satellite-Derived Atmospheric Motion Vectors on Numerical Weather Prediction in East Asia Using an Adjoint-Based Observation Impact Method

Effect of Enhanced Satellite-Derived Atmospheric Motion Vectors on Numerical Weather Prediction... AbstractWhen producing forecasts by integrating a numerical weather prediction model from an analysis, not all observations assimilated into the analysis improve the forecast. Therefore, the impact of particular observations on the forecast needs to be evaluated quantitatively to provide relevant information about the impact of the observing system. One way to assess the observation impact is to use an adjoint-based method that estimates the impact of each assimilated observation on reducing the error of the forecast. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model and its adjoint are used to evaluate the impact of several types of observations, including enhanced satellite-derived atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) that were made available during observation campaigns for two typhoons: Sinlaku and Jangmi, which both formed in the western North Pacific during September 2008. Without the assimilation of enhanced AMV data, radiosonde observations and satellite radiances show the highest total observation impact on forecasts. When enhanced AMVs are included in the assimilation, the observation impact of AMVs is increased and the impact of radiances is decreased. The highest ratio of beneficial observations comes from GPS Precipitable Water (GPSPW) without the assimilation of enhanced AMVs. Most observations express a ratio of approximately 60%. Enhanced AMVs improve forecast fields when tracking the typhoon centers of Sinlaku and Jangmi. Both the model background and the analysis are improved by the continuous cycling of enhanced AMVs, with a greater reduction in forecast error along the background trajectory than the analysis trajectory. Thus, while the analysis–forecast system is improved by assimilating these observations, the total observation impact is smaller as a result of the improvement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Weather and Forecasting American Meteorological Society

Effect of Enhanced Satellite-Derived Atmospheric Motion Vectors on Numerical Weather Prediction in East Asia Using an Adjoint-Based Observation Impact Method

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0434
eISSN
1520-0434
D.O.I.
10.1175/WAF-D-16-0061.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractWhen producing forecasts by integrating a numerical weather prediction model from an analysis, not all observations assimilated into the analysis improve the forecast. Therefore, the impact of particular observations on the forecast needs to be evaluated quantitatively to provide relevant information about the impact of the observing system. One way to assess the observation impact is to use an adjoint-based method that estimates the impact of each assimilated observation on reducing the error of the forecast. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model and its adjoint are used to evaluate the impact of several types of observations, including enhanced satellite-derived atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) that were made available during observation campaigns for two typhoons: Sinlaku and Jangmi, which both formed in the western North Pacific during September 2008. Without the assimilation of enhanced AMV data, radiosonde observations and satellite radiances show the highest total observation impact on forecasts. When enhanced AMVs are included in the assimilation, the observation impact of AMVs is increased and the impact of radiances is decreased. The highest ratio of beneficial observations comes from GPS Precipitable Water (GPSPW) without the assimilation of enhanced AMVs. Most observations express a ratio of approximately 60%. Enhanced AMVs improve forecast fields when tracking the typhoon centers of Sinlaku and Jangmi. Both the model background and the analysis are improved by the continuous cycling of enhanced AMVs, with a greater reduction in forecast error along the background trajectory than the analysis trajectory. Thus, while the analysis–forecast system is improved by assimilating these observations, the total observation impact is smaller as a result of the improvement.

Journal

Weather and ForecastingAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 30, 2017

References

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