corrigendum

corrigendum I must acknowledge the continued good coop- Today, one can find over 15 supercomputers at eration among the satellite operators. The latest least partially committed to World Weather Watch example between EUMETSATan d NOAA/NESDIS operational functions. The number of centers with truly to provide Atlantic coverage continues the tradition. powerful computer facilities throughout the world is increasing rapidly, not only in develope d countries, but • Buoys—Ever since FGGE, the value of data from also in the developing world. a network of drifting buoys has been acknowl- edged. To date, the existing buoy programs are principally operated by research groups, such as TOGA. It is hoped that initiatives such as the Global 6- Wrap-up Ocean Observing System will provide mechanisms that the WWW can work with in order to build a In closing, I would like to leave you with just a few planned and truly operational global drifting buoy thoughts. We must not take for granted the interna- system. tional framework upon which international meteorol- Turning to telecommunications, one can foresee ogy depends. We must "bridge the gap" so that all the advent of two-way point-to-multipoint satellite com- nations enjoy truly effective meteorological services, munications carrying and disseminating basic obser- and we must encourage and foster the international vational data among members as well as analysis and cooperation that has served us so well to date. forecast products from the major WW W centers. Initial In five hours or so, a major event will happen around starts have been made using the data-collection sys- the world— a virtual army of technicians and observers tems of the geostationary satellites and the Meteoro- will once again take the 00 00 observations, encode logical Data Distribution (MDD) system of METEOSAT. the data and transmit it to all other members of WMO. The Operational World Weather Watch Systems Evalu- At certain centers, computers wait for the data to ation (OWSE)-Africa has proven the viability of such process it and produce and disseminate NWP guid- a concept, and data are now being acquired from ance information. Meteorologists will assemble the areas suffering difficult and inadequate telecommuni- data and guidance information to provide the forecast, cations in about 15 African countries. The MDD sys- warning, and applications products that all of us re- tems have been under evaluation in Kenya and Niger. quire. The encouraging thing for me is that this is a It is felt one of the keys to developing sustainable continuing commitment by all countries and it works. meteorological services in the developing countries is Finally, we must find ways to utilize the new tech- to ensure their access to global and regional products, nologies to both improve the World Weather Watch thereby providing a means to do local services and system and to assist meteorologists in doing their thus developing the confidence of their governments prediction job better. This includes the education and to invest more in the basic infrastructures such as training of meteorologists and technicians, as well as observation and telecommunications. the incorporation of improved observational, telecom- Finally, on the data-processing side, regional spe- munication, and data-processing systems. cialized centers organized more or less on the ex- I hope this short talk has given you a flavor of how ample of ECMWF are being implemented in Africa things are going in the world of international opera- (ACMA D in Niamey), Asia (ASEAN Centre in tional meteorology. It has been a pleasure to have the Singapore), and Latin America (Brazil). In addition, chance to brief you on that part of it called the World drought-monitoring centers are already in place and Weather Watch. We look for leadership and innova- working in Nairobi (Kenya) and Harare (Zimbabwe). tion from organizations such as the AMS, and your Add to this the emerging center at Fiji in the Tropical publications, technical conferences, and symposia Cyclone Program, and one senses the obvious trend are major contributions upon which improvements in for having regional centers organized by an d providing meteorological services and science worldwide—are specific services to countries within a region. based. • In the article, "A Century of Monitoring Weather and Crops: The Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin," (Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc, 73,180-186), the following correction should be noted: The editor of the Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin from 1924 to 1944 was J. B. Kincer, and not J. B. Kinger. Bulletin American Meteorological Society 481 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

I must acknowledge the continued good coop- Today, one can find over 15 supercomputers at eration among the satellite operators. The latest least partially committed to World Weather Watch example between EUMETSATan d NOAA/NESDIS operational functions. The number of centers with truly to provide Atlantic coverage continues the tradition. powerful computer facilities throughout the world is increasing rapidly, not only in develope d countries, but • Buoys—Ever since FGGE, the value of data from also in the developing world. a network of drifting buoys has been acknowl- edged. To date, the existing buoy programs are principally operated by research groups, such as TOGA. It is hoped that initiatives such as the Global 6- Wrap-up Ocean Observing System will provide mechanisms that the WWW can work with in order to build a In closing, I would like to leave you with just a few planned and truly operational global drifting buoy thoughts. We must not take for granted the interna- system. tional framework upon which international meteorol- Turning to telecommunications, one can foresee ogy depends. We must "bridge the gap" so that all the advent of two-way point-to-multipoint satellite com- nations enjoy truly effective meteorological services, munications carrying and disseminating basic obser- and we must encourage and foster the international vational data among members as well as analysis and cooperation that has served us so well to date. forecast products from the major WW W centers. Initial In five hours or so, a major event will happen around starts have been made using the data-collection sys- the world— a virtual army of technicians and observers tems of the geostationary satellites and the Meteoro- will once again take the 00 00 observations, encode logical Data Distribution (MDD) system of METEOSAT. the data and transmit it to all other members of WMO. The Operational World Weather Watch Systems Evalu- At certain centers, computers wait for the data to ation (OWSE)-Africa has proven the viability of such process it and produce and disseminate NWP guid- a concept, and data are now being acquired from ance information. Meteorologists will assemble the areas suffering difficult and inadequate telecommuni- data and guidance information to provide the forecast, cations in about 15 African countries. The MDD sys- warning, and applications products that all of us re- tems have been under evaluation in Kenya and Niger. quire. The encouraging thing for me is that this is a It is felt one of the keys to developing sustainable continuing commitment by all countries and it works. meteorological services in the developing countries is Finally, we must find ways to utilize the new tech- to ensure their access to global and regional products, nologies to both improve the World Weather Watch thereby providing a means to do local services and system and to assist meteorologists in doing their thus developing the confidence of their governments prediction job better. This includes the education and to invest more in the basic infrastructures such as training of meteorologists and technicians, as well as observation and telecommunications. the incorporation of improved observational, telecom- Finally, on the data-processing side, regional spe- munication, and data-processing systems. cialized centers organized more or less on the ex- I hope this short talk has given you a flavor of how ample of ECMWF are being implemented in Africa things are going in the world of international opera- (ACMA D in Niamey), Asia (ASEAN Centre in tional meteorology. It has been a pleasure to have the Singapore), and Latin America (Brazil). In addition, chance to brief you on that part of it called the World drought-monitoring centers are already in place and Weather Watch. We look for leadership and innova- working in Nairobi (Kenya) and Harare (Zimbabwe). tion from organizations such as the AMS, and your Add to this the emerging center at Fiji in the Tropical publications, technical conferences, and symposia Cyclone Program, and one senses the obvious trend are major contributions upon which improvements in for having regional centers organized by an d providing meteorological services and science worldwide—are specific services to countries within a region. based. • In the article, "A Century of Monitoring Weather and Crops: The Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin," (Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc, 73,180-186), the following correction should be noted: The editor of the Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin from 1924 to 1944 was J. B. Kincer, and not J. B. Kinger. Bulletin American Meteorological Society 481

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 1, 1992

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