COMMENTS

COMMENTS however, that the enormity of the fatality estimates Low-Level Winds in in W2007 might discourage emergency managers fro m plannin g for such an event, because the y would Tornadoes and Potential simply be overwhelmed by such a disaster. Two assumptions drive the fatality estimates in Catastrophic Tornado W2007. First, W200 7 estimate tha t 10% of occupants Impacts in Urban Areas withi n housing subjected to Fujita-scale F4 and greate r winds would be killed. Second, W2007 assume s that the maximu m intensity and areal — H AROL D E. BROOKS extent of high winds are held constant over nearly NOAA/Nationa l Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma th e entire length of the storm path. Both of these assumption s are open to question and, we believe, — C HARLE S A . DOSWELL III represent significant overestimates of th e likely high- The University of Oklahoma, end events. An examination of past tornado events Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies; suggests these are simply unrealistic values. Norman, Oklahoma W2007's assumption that 10% of residents in the — D ANIE L SUTTER pat h of such a catastrophi c tornad o would be killed is University of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/BAMS-89-1-87
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

however, that the enormity of the fatality estimates Low-Level Winds in in W2007 might discourage emergency managers fro m plannin g for such an event, because the y would Tornadoes and Potential simply be overwhelmed by such a disaster. Two assumptions drive the fatality estimates in Catastrophic Tornado W2007. First, W200 7 estimate tha t 10% of occupants Impacts in Urban Areas withi n housing subjected to Fujita-scale F4 and greate r winds would be killed. Second, W2007 assume s that the maximu m intensity and areal — H AROL D E. BROOKS extent of high winds are held constant over nearly NOAA/Nationa l Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma th e entire length of the storm path. Both of these assumption s are open to question and, we believe, — C HARLE S A . DOSWELL III represent significant overestimates of th e likely high- The University of Oklahoma, end events. An examination of past tornado events Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies; suggests these are simply unrealistic values. Norman, Oklahoma W2007's assumption that 10% of residents in the — D ANIE L SUTTER pat h of such a catastrophi c tornad o would be killed is University of

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 2008

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