Characteristics of Explosive Cyclones over the Northern Pacific

Characteristics of Explosive Cyclones over the Northern Pacific AbstractExplosive cyclones (ECs) over the northern Pacific Ocean during the cold season (October–April) over a 15-yr (2000–15) period are analyzed by using the Final (FNL) Analysis data provided by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. These ECs are stratified into four categories according to their intensity: weak, moderate, strong, and super ECs. In addition, according to the spatial distribution of their maximum-deepening-rate positions, ECs are further classified into five regions: the Japan–Okhotsk Sea (JOS), the northwestern Pacific (NWP), the west-central Pacific (WCP), the east-central Pacific (ECP), and the northeastern Pacific (NEP). The occurrence frequency of ECs shows evident seasonal variations for the various regions over the northern Pacific. NWP ECs frequently occur in winter and early spring, WCP and ECP ECs frequently occur in winter, and JOS and NEP ECs mainly occur in autumn and early spring. The occurrence frequency, averaged maximum deepening rate, and developing and explosive-developing lifetimes of ECs decrease eastward over the northern Pacific, excluding JOS ECs, consistent with the climatological intensity distributions of the upper-level jet stream, midlevel positive vorticity, and low-level baroclinicity. On the seasonal scale, the occurrence frequency and spatial distribution of ECs are highly correlated with the intensity and position of the upper-level jet stream, respectively, and also with those of midlevel positive vorticity and low-level baroclinicity. Over the northwestern Pacific, the warm ocean surface also contributes to the rapid development of ECs. The composite analysis indicates that the large-scale atmospheric environment for NWP and NEP ECs shows significant differences from that for the 15-yr cold-season average. The southwesterly anomalies of the upper-level jet stream and positive anomalies of midlevel vorticity favor the prevalence of NWP and NEP ECs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology American Meteorological Society

Characteristics of Explosive Cyclones over the Northern Pacific

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/characteristics-of-explosive-cyclones-over-the-northern-pacific-SRUlL0CMMz
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1558-8432
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0330.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractExplosive cyclones (ECs) over the northern Pacific Ocean during the cold season (October–April) over a 15-yr (2000–15) period are analyzed by using the Final (FNL) Analysis data provided by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. These ECs are stratified into four categories according to their intensity: weak, moderate, strong, and super ECs. In addition, according to the spatial distribution of their maximum-deepening-rate positions, ECs are further classified into five regions: the Japan–Okhotsk Sea (JOS), the northwestern Pacific (NWP), the west-central Pacific (WCP), the east-central Pacific (ECP), and the northeastern Pacific (NEP). The occurrence frequency of ECs shows evident seasonal variations for the various regions over the northern Pacific. NWP ECs frequently occur in winter and early spring, WCP and ECP ECs frequently occur in winter, and JOS and NEP ECs mainly occur in autumn and early spring. The occurrence frequency, averaged maximum deepening rate, and developing and explosive-developing lifetimes of ECs decrease eastward over the northern Pacific, excluding JOS ECs, consistent with the climatological intensity distributions of the upper-level jet stream, midlevel positive vorticity, and low-level baroclinicity. On the seasonal scale, the occurrence frequency and spatial distribution of ECs are highly correlated with the intensity and position of the upper-level jet stream, respectively, and also with those of midlevel positive vorticity and low-level baroclinicity. Over the northwestern Pacific, the warm ocean surface also contributes to the rapid development of ECs. The composite analysis indicates that the large-scale atmospheric environment for NWP and NEP ECs shows significant differences from that for the 15-yr cold-season average. The southwesterly anomalies of the upper-level jet stream and positive anomalies of midlevel vorticity favor the prevalence of NWP and NEP ECs.

Journal

Journal of Applied Meteorology and ClimatologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Dec 11, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off