CERTIFIED CONSULTING METEOROLOGIST

CERTIFIED CONSULTING METEOROLOGIST chapter news El Paso-Las Cruces this interesting presentation was on the possible col- The first meeting of the 1998-99 local AMS chap- laborative effort between PSL and NOAA/FSL called ter year was held on 7 October 1998. Chapter Presi- the Global Air Ocean In-Situ System. McCune ex- dent Dave Sauter opened the meeting at the White plained that superpressure helium-filled balloons Sands Missile Range's Frontier Club. Nineteen mem- launched as part of this proposed program will stay bers and guests attended. The business portion of the airborne for up to a year, and they will carry recover- meeting addressed upcoming meeting dates, locations, able/refurbishable payloads. Balloon navigators on the and speakers. Annual membership dues and the 79th ground will be able to control altitudes of the balloons, AMS Annual Meeting in Dallas were also discussed. and a network of up to 400 balloons worldwide is pos- sible. They will fly at altitudes of 60,000-75,000 ft and Guest speaker for the meeting was Ted Sammis, deploy weather dropsondes on a routine basis as well state climatologist for New Mexico. Sammis began by as sensors for ocean and atmospheric chemistry stud- providing some background history on how the state climatologist position has evolved during recent years. ies. McCune remarked that the project, if fully funded, He also reviewed the wide range of weather-related in- would benefit weather forecasts, climate modeling, formation available on the New Mexico climate Web synoptic oceanography, ocean climate modeling, and site at weather.nmsu.edu or weather-mirror.nmsu.edu. atmospheric chemistry modeling, and would provide Sammis ended his presentation with a short question- a complement to satellite data capabilities. Funding and-answer period. should be allocated to test the concept in the next few years.—Dave Knapp. The 18 November 1998 meeting was also held at the Frontier Club with 21 local chapter members and Twi n Cities guests attending. Business items discussed included the status of local chapter funds, chapter participation The October meeting of the Twin Cities Chapter in the upcoming local middle and high school science was held at the Chanhassen, Minnesota, office of the fairs, and a reminder that nominations for elections of National Weather Service. This season is the 50th an- chapter officers were requested as elections would be niversary of the chapter. Chapter President Craig held in January. Edwards expressed his desire to have 50 chapter mem- The speaker for the meeting was Bernie McCune, bers this year. the Physical Science Laboratory (PSL) at New Mexico Rich Naistat, chair of the local arrangements com- State University, who spoke about ballooning projects mittee of the 19th Conference on Severe Local Storms, at PSL. He provided a review of the National Atmo- gave a brief report. Of 338 accepted papers, only 10 spheric and Space Administration (NASA) ballooning authors were unable to attend despite a strike by North- and joint projects PSL has undertaken with the Na- west Airlines; the number was expected to be much tional Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration higher. (NOAA) and NASA. The focus of the remainder of Psychologist Tom Wright was the speaker for the evening. He presented a history of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) research and current methods of therapy. He pointed out that SAD is caused by a lack of light and that it is not weather related. The number of people affected varies geographically, with the greatest number in the higher latitudes. Symptoms are not diagnosed as SAD unless three episodes occur over 587 Pamela Naber Knox 1999 three winter cycles and are not related to other causes of depression. Treatment includes psychotherapy, 49 6 Vol. 80,, No. 3, March J 999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

CERTIFIED CONSULTING METEOROLOGIST

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10.1175/1520-0477-80.3.496b
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Abstract

chapter news El Paso-Las Cruces this interesting presentation was on the possible col- The first meeting of the 1998-99 local AMS chap- laborative effort between PSL and NOAA/FSL called ter year was held on 7 October 1998. Chapter Presi- the Global Air Ocean In-Situ System. McCune ex- dent Dave Sauter opened the meeting at the White plained that superpressure helium-filled balloons Sands Missile Range's Frontier Club. Nineteen mem- launched as part of this proposed program will stay bers and guests attended. The business portion of the airborne for up to a year, and they will carry recover- meeting addressed upcoming meeting dates, locations, able/refurbishable payloads. Balloon navigators on the and speakers. Annual membership dues and the 79th ground will be able to control altitudes of the balloons, AMS Annual Meeting in Dallas were also discussed. and a network of up to 400 balloons worldwide is pos- sible. They will fly at altitudes of 60,000-75,000 ft and Guest speaker for the meeting was Ted Sammis, deploy weather dropsondes on a routine basis as well state climatologist for New Mexico. Sammis began by as sensors for ocean and atmospheric chemistry stud- providing some background history on how the state climatologist position has evolved during recent years. ies. McCune remarked that the project, if fully funded, He also reviewed the wide range of weather-related in- would benefit weather forecasts, climate modeling, formation available on the New Mexico climate Web synoptic oceanography, ocean climate modeling, and site at weather.nmsu.edu or weather-mirror.nmsu.edu. atmospheric chemistry modeling, and would provide Sammis ended his presentation with a short question- a complement to satellite data capabilities. Funding and-answer period. should be allocated to test the concept in the next few years.—Dave Knapp. The 18 November 1998 meeting was also held at the Frontier Club with 21 local chapter members and Twi n Cities guests attending. Business items discussed included the status of local chapter funds, chapter participation The October meeting of the Twin Cities Chapter in the upcoming local middle and high school science was held at the Chanhassen, Minnesota, office of the fairs, and a reminder that nominations for elections of National Weather Service. This season is the 50th an- chapter officers were requested as elections would be niversary of the chapter. Chapter President Craig held in January. Edwards expressed his desire to have 50 chapter mem- The speaker for the meeting was Bernie McCune, bers this year. the Physical Science Laboratory (PSL) at New Mexico Rich Naistat, chair of the local arrangements com- State University, who spoke about ballooning projects mittee of the 19th Conference on Severe Local Storms, at PSL. He provided a review of the National Atmo- gave a brief report. Of 338 accepted papers, only 10 spheric and Space Administration (NASA) ballooning authors were unable to attend despite a strike by North- and joint projects PSL has undertaken with the Na- west Airlines; the number was expected to be much tional Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration higher. (NOAA) and NASA. The focus of the remainder of Psychologist Tom Wright was the speaker for the evening. He presented a history of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) research and current methods of therapy. He pointed out that SAD is caused by a lack of light and that it is not weather related. The number of people affected varies geographically, with the greatest number in the higher latitudes. Symptoms are not diagnosed as SAD unless three episodes occur over 587 Pamela Naber Knox 1999 three winter cycles and are not related to other causes of depression. Treatment includes psychotherapy, 49 6 Vol. 80,, No. 3, March J 999

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1999

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