Can Barents Sea ice decline in spring enhance summer hot drought events over northeastern China?

Can Barents Sea ice decline in spring enhance summer hot drought events over northeastern China? AbstractIn July-August (JA) of 2016, northeastern China (NEC) suffered from the most severe hot drought event of the past 50 years, leading to profound impacts on agriculture, the ecosystem, and society. Results indicate that the loss of sea ice over the Barents Sea (SICBS) in March might influence the hot drought events over NEC in JA for the period of 1997-2016. Further analyses reveal that lower SICBS is closely related to thinner snow depth over western Eurasia (SDWEA) in April. The decline of SDWEA leads to drier soil from the Yangtze River valley to northern China during May-June, which is favorable for precipitation deficiency over NEC in JA. Besides, the loss of SICBS in March and decline of SDWEA in April are closely related to the Polar/Eurasia teleconnection pattern and dry soil over NEC in JA, which provides favorable atmospheric circulation patterns for occurrences of hot droughts. The large ensemble simulations from the Community Earth System Model and the numerical experiments that based on the version 4 of Community Atmosphere Model further confirmed their connections and the associated possible physical processes. Therefore, snow depth and soil moisture might serve as linkages between Barents Sea ice in March and hot droughts over NEC during JA, and the Barents Sea ice in March might be an important potential predictor for the summer hot droughts over NEC. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Climate American Meteorological Society

Can Barents Sea ice decline in spring enhance summer hot drought events over northeastern China?

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0442
D.O.I.
10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0429.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractIn July-August (JA) of 2016, northeastern China (NEC) suffered from the most severe hot drought event of the past 50 years, leading to profound impacts on agriculture, the ecosystem, and society. Results indicate that the loss of sea ice over the Barents Sea (SICBS) in March might influence the hot drought events over NEC in JA for the period of 1997-2016. Further analyses reveal that lower SICBS is closely related to thinner snow depth over western Eurasia (SDWEA) in April. The decline of SDWEA leads to drier soil from the Yangtze River valley to northern China during May-June, which is favorable for precipitation deficiency over NEC in JA. Besides, the loss of SICBS in March and decline of SDWEA in April are closely related to the Polar/Eurasia teleconnection pattern and dry soil over NEC in JA, which provides favorable atmospheric circulation patterns for occurrences of hot droughts. The large ensemble simulations from the Community Earth System Model and the numerical experiments that based on the version 4 of Community Atmosphere Model further confirmed their connections and the associated possible physical processes. Therefore, snow depth and soil moisture might serve as linkages between Barents Sea ice in March and hot droughts over NEC during JA, and the Barents Sea ice in March might be an important potential predictor for the summer hot droughts over NEC.

Journal

Journal of ClimateAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 15, 2018

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