Boundary Layer Experiment 1996 (BLX96)

Boundary Layer Experiment 1996 (BLX96) The University of Wyoming King Air aircraft was the primary instrument platform for turbulence measurements in the bottom half of the convective boundary layer during 15 July13 August 1996. A total of 12 successful research flights were made, each of about 4.5-h duration. Crosswind (eastwest) flight patterns were flown in Oklahoma and Kansas over three sites of different land use: forest, pasture, and crops.Measurements of mean values, turbulent deviations, and turbulent fluxes of temperature, moisture, and momentum were made to test theories of convective transport, the radix layer, and cumulus potential. Additional portions of each flight included slant soundings and near-surface horizontal flights in order to determine mixed layer (ML) scaling variables such as ML depth zi, Deardorff velocity w, and buoyancy velocity wB, While the ML was shallower and the ground wetter than anticipated based on climatology, a high-quality dataset was obtained. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

Boundary Layer Experiment 1996 (BLX96)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/boundary-layer-experiment-1996-blx96-fCsxS3QbKB
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477(1997)078<1149:BLEB>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The University of Wyoming King Air aircraft was the primary instrument platform for turbulence measurements in the bottom half of the convective boundary layer during 15 July13 August 1996. A total of 12 successful research flights were made, each of about 4.5-h duration. Crosswind (eastwest) flight patterns were flown in Oklahoma and Kansas over three sites of different land use: forest, pasture, and crops.Measurements of mean values, turbulent deviations, and turbulent fluxes of temperature, moisture, and momentum were made to test theories of convective transport, the radix layer, and cumulus potential. Additional portions of each flight included slant soundings and near-surface horizontal flights in order to determine mixed layer (ML) scaling variables such as ML depth zi, Deardorff velocity w, and buoyancy velocity wB, While the ML was shallower and the ground wetter than anticipated based on climatology, a high-quality dataset was obtained.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 12, 1997

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off