Atmospheric Turbulence Observations in the Vicinity of Surface Fires in Forested Environments

Atmospheric Turbulence Observations in the Vicinity of Surface Fires in Forested Environments AbstractAmbient and fire-induced atmospheric turbulence in the vicinity of wildland fires can affect the behavior of those fires and the dispersion of smoke. The presence of forest overstory vegetation can further complicate the evolution of local turbulence regimes and their interaction with spreading fires and smoke plumes. Previous observational studies of wildland fire events in forested environments have shown that turbulence energy and anisotropy in the vicinity of spreading line fires exhibit temporal and spatial variability influenced by the presence of overstory vegetation. This study builds on those previous observational studies to further examine turbulence regimes during two wildland fires in forested environments, with an emphasis on the effects of forest canopies on turbulence energy budgets, the skewness in turbulent velocity distributions, and stability–anisotropy variations before, during, and after fire-front-passage periods. Analyses indicate that turbulence anisotropy tends to persist throughout the vertical extent of overstory vegetation layers even during highly buoyant fire-front-passage periods, with horizontal velocity perturbations dominating over vertical velocity perturbations. The analyses also suggest that the periods before and after fire-front passage in forested environments can be very different with respect to how diffusion and shear production concurrently affect the evolution of turbulence energy within the canopy layer. In addition, horizontal and vertical velocity distribution analyses carried out in this study suggest that spreading line fires can have a substantial effect on the skewness of daytime velocity distributions typically observed inside forest vegetation layers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology American Meteorological Society

Atmospheric Turbulence Observations in the Vicinity of Surface Fires in Forested Environments

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1558-8432
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAMC-D-17-0146.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractAmbient and fire-induced atmospheric turbulence in the vicinity of wildland fires can affect the behavior of those fires and the dispersion of smoke. The presence of forest overstory vegetation can further complicate the evolution of local turbulence regimes and their interaction with spreading fires and smoke plumes. Previous observational studies of wildland fire events in forested environments have shown that turbulence energy and anisotropy in the vicinity of spreading line fires exhibit temporal and spatial variability influenced by the presence of overstory vegetation. This study builds on those previous observational studies to further examine turbulence regimes during two wildland fires in forested environments, with an emphasis on the effects of forest canopies on turbulence energy budgets, the skewness in turbulent velocity distributions, and stability–anisotropy variations before, during, and after fire-front-passage periods. Analyses indicate that turbulence anisotropy tends to persist throughout the vertical extent of overstory vegetation layers even during highly buoyant fire-front-passage periods, with horizontal velocity perturbations dominating over vertical velocity perturbations. The analyses also suggest that the periods before and after fire-front passage in forested environments can be very different with respect to how diffusion and shear production concurrently affect the evolution of turbulence energy within the canopy layer. In addition, horizontal and vertical velocity distribution analyses carried out in this study suggest that spreading line fires can have a substantial effect on the skewness of daytime velocity distributions typically observed inside forest vegetation layers.

Journal

Journal of Applied Meteorology and ClimatologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Dec 26, 2017

References

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