Assimilation of ZDR Columns for Improving the Spin-Up and Forecast of Convective Storms in Storm-Scale Models: Proof-of-Concept Experiments

Assimilation of ZDR Columns for Improving the Spin-Up and Forecast of Convective Storms in... AbstractAchieving accurate storm-scale analyses and reducing the spin-up time of modeled convection is a primary motivation for the assimilation of radar reflectivity data. One common technique of reflectivity data assimilation is using a cloud analysis, which inserts temperature and moisture increments and hydrometeors deduced from radar reflectivity via empirical relations to induce and sustain updraft circulations. Polarimetric radar data have the ability to provide enhanced insight into the microphysical and dynamic structure of convection. Thus far, however, relatively little has been done to leverage these data for numerical weather prediction. In this study, the Advanced Regional Prediction System’s cloud analysis is modified from its original reflectivity-based formulation to provide moisture and latent heat adjustments based on the detection of differential reflectivity columns, which can serve as proxies for updrafts in deep moist convection and, subsequently, areas of saturation and latent heat release. Cycled model runs using both the original cloud analysis and above modifications are performed for two high impact weather cases: the 19 May 2013 central Oklahoma tornadic supercells and the 25 May 2016 north-central Kansas tornadic supercell. The analyses and forecasts of convection qualitatively and quantitatively improve in both cases, including more coherent analyzed updrafts, more realistic forecast reflectivity structures, a better correspondence between forecast updraft helicity tracks and radar-derived rotation tracks, and improved frequency biases and equitable threat scores for reflectivity. Based on these encouraging results, further exploration of the assimilation of dual-polarization radar data into storm-scale models is warranted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Monthly Weather Review American Meteorological Society

Assimilation of ZDR Columns for Improving the Spin-Up and Forecast of Convective Storms in Storm-Scale Models: Proof-of-Concept Experiments

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0493
D.O.I.
10.1175/MWR-D-17-0103.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractAchieving accurate storm-scale analyses and reducing the spin-up time of modeled convection is a primary motivation for the assimilation of radar reflectivity data. One common technique of reflectivity data assimilation is using a cloud analysis, which inserts temperature and moisture increments and hydrometeors deduced from radar reflectivity via empirical relations to induce and sustain updraft circulations. Polarimetric radar data have the ability to provide enhanced insight into the microphysical and dynamic structure of convection. Thus far, however, relatively little has been done to leverage these data for numerical weather prediction. In this study, the Advanced Regional Prediction System’s cloud analysis is modified from its original reflectivity-based formulation to provide moisture and latent heat adjustments based on the detection of differential reflectivity columns, which can serve as proxies for updrafts in deep moist convection and, subsequently, areas of saturation and latent heat release. Cycled model runs using both the original cloud analysis and above modifications are performed for two high impact weather cases: the 19 May 2013 central Oklahoma tornadic supercells and the 25 May 2016 north-central Kansas tornadic supercell. The analyses and forecasts of convection qualitatively and quantitatively improve in both cases, including more coherent analyzed updrafts, more realistic forecast reflectivity structures, a better correspondence between forecast updraft helicity tracks and radar-derived rotation tracks, and improved frequency biases and equitable threat scores for reflectivity. Based on these encouraging results, further exploration of the assimilation of dual-polarization radar data into storm-scale models is warranted.

Journal

Monthly Weather ReviewAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 12, 2017

References

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