Assessing the impact of climate change on the waterlogging risk in coastal cities: A case study of Guangzhou, South China

Assessing the impact of climate change on the waterlogging risk in coastal cities: A case study... AbstractClimate warming is expected to occur through an increased magnitude of extreme precipitation and sea level rise, which leads to an increased probability of waterlogging in coastal cities. In this paper, we developed a combined probability model to evaluate the impact of climate change on waterlogging in Guangzhou by using eight climate models with four emission scenarios (Special Report on Emissions Scenario (SRES) scenario A1B and representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP8.5). The copula method was applied to derive the bivariate distributions of extreme rainfall and tidal level. The uncertainty in the projected future temperature, extreme rainfall, sea level, and the combined extreme rainfall and tidal level probability were discussed. The results show that, although there is a large uncertainty driven by both climate models and emission scenarios in the projection of climate change, most modeling results predict an increase in temperature and extreme precipitation in Guangzhou during the future period of 2020–2050, relative to the historical period of 1970–2000. Moreover, greater increases are projected for higher emission scenarios. The sea level is projected to increase in the range of 11.40–23.37 cm during the period 2020–2050, consistent with climate warming. Both simultaneous probability and waterlogging probability are projected to show an upward trend in the future period 2020–2050, with the largest and smallest increases in RCP4.5 and RCP2.6 scenarios, respectively. The results of this paper provide a new scientific reference for waterlogging control in Guangzhou under climate change conditions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Hydrometeorology American Meteorological Society

Assessing the impact of climate change on the waterlogging risk in coastal cities: A case study of Guangzhou, South China

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1525-7541
eISSN
1525-7541
D.O.I.
10.1175/JHM-D-16-0157.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractClimate warming is expected to occur through an increased magnitude of extreme precipitation and sea level rise, which leads to an increased probability of waterlogging in coastal cities. In this paper, we developed a combined probability model to evaluate the impact of climate change on waterlogging in Guangzhou by using eight climate models with four emission scenarios (Special Report on Emissions Scenario (SRES) scenario A1B and representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP8.5). The copula method was applied to derive the bivariate distributions of extreme rainfall and tidal level. The uncertainty in the projected future temperature, extreme rainfall, sea level, and the combined extreme rainfall and tidal level probability were discussed. The results show that, although there is a large uncertainty driven by both climate models and emission scenarios in the projection of climate change, most modeling results predict an increase in temperature and extreme precipitation in Guangzhou during the future period of 2020–2050, relative to the historical period of 1970–2000. Moreover, greater increases are projected for higher emission scenarios. The sea level is projected to increase in the range of 11.40–23.37 cm during the period 2020–2050, consistent with climate warming. Both simultaneous probability and waterlogging probability are projected to show an upward trend in the future period 2020–2050, with the largest and smallest increases in RCP4.5 and RCP2.6 scenarios, respectively. The results of this paper provide a new scientific reference for waterlogging control in Guangzhou under climate change conditions.

Journal

Journal of HydrometeorologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 30, 2017

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