Analysis of rain types and their Z-R relationships at different locations in the high Andes of southern Ecuador

Analysis of rain types and their Z-R relationships at different locations in the high Andes of... AbstractInformation on the spatio-temporal rainfall occurrence, its microphysical characteristics and its Z-R relations required to provide rainfall mapping based on rain radar data is hardly available for tropical high mountains. Therefore, this study aims to analyze rainfall types in the Andes cordillera to derive different rain-type Z-R relations using disdrometer observations at three study sites representative for different geographic positions and elevations (2610, 3626 and 3773 m a.s.l.). Rain categorization based on mean drop volume diameter (Dm) thresholds (; ; ) was performed using drop size distribution (DSD) data at a 5-min time step over an approximate 2-year period at each location. It was found that: (i) Rain observations characterized by higher(lower) Dm and rain rates are more frequent at the lower(higher) site. (ii) Due to its geographic position, very light rain (drizzle) is more common at higher altitudes with longer-duration events while rainfall is more convective at the lower range. (iii) The specific spatial exposition regarding cloud and rain formation seems to play an important role for the local Z-R relationship derivation. (iv) Low A coefficients () for first rain type resemble typical characteristics of orographic precipitation. (v) Greater values of A (lowest and highest stations for Dm >1.0 mm) are attributed to transitional rainfall as found in other studies. (vi) Rain-type Z-R relations show a better adjustment in comparison to sitespecific Z-R relationships. The study is the first contribution of Z-R relations for tropical rainfall at the high Andes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology American Meteorological Society

Analysis of rain types and their Z-R relationships at different locations in the high Andes of southern Ecuador

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1558-8432
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAMC-D-17-0009.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractInformation on the spatio-temporal rainfall occurrence, its microphysical characteristics and its Z-R relations required to provide rainfall mapping based on rain radar data is hardly available for tropical high mountains. Therefore, this study aims to analyze rainfall types in the Andes cordillera to derive different rain-type Z-R relations using disdrometer observations at three study sites representative for different geographic positions and elevations (2610, 3626 and 3773 m a.s.l.). Rain categorization based on mean drop volume diameter (Dm) thresholds (; ; ) was performed using drop size distribution (DSD) data at a 5-min time step over an approximate 2-year period at each location. It was found that: (i) Rain observations characterized by higher(lower) Dm and rain rates are more frequent at the lower(higher) site. (ii) Due to its geographic position, very light rain (drizzle) is more common at higher altitudes with longer-duration events while rainfall is more convective at the lower range. (iii) The specific spatial exposition regarding cloud and rain formation seems to play an important role for the local Z-R relationship derivation. (iv) Low A coefficients () for first rain type resemble typical characteristics of orographic precipitation. (v) Greater values of A (lowest and highest stations for Dm >1.0 mm) are attributed to transitional rainfall as found in other studies. (vi) Rain-type Z-R relations show a better adjustment in comparison to sitespecific Z-R relationships. The study is the first contribution of Z-R relations for tropical rainfall at the high Andes.

Journal

Journal of Applied Meteorology and ClimatologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Aug 24, 2017

References

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