AN OBSERVING SYSTEM SIMULATION EXPERIMENT FOR THE CALIBRATION AND VALIDATION OF THE SURFACE WATER AND OCEAN TOPOGRAPHY SEA SURFACE HEIGHT MEASUREMENT USING IN-SITU PLATFORMS

AN OBSERVING SYSTEM SIMULATION EXPERIMENT FOR THE CALIBRATION AND VALIDATION OF THE SURFACE WATER... AbstractThe wavenumber spectrum of sea surface height (SSH) is an important indicator of the dynamics of the ocean interior. While it has been well-studied at mesoscale wavelengths and longer, using both in-situ oceanographic measurements and satellite altimetry, the SSH wavenumber spectrum remains largely unknown for wavelengths less than ~70km. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission aims to resolve the SSH wavenumber spectrum at 15-150km wavelengths, which is specified as one of the mission requirements. The mission calibration and validation (CalVal) requires the ground-truth of a synoptic SSH field resolving the targeted wavelengths, but no existing observational network is able to fulfill the task. We use a high-resolution global ocean simulation to conduct an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) to identify the suitable oceanographic in-situ measurements for SWOT SSH-CalVal. After fixing 20 measuring locations (the minimum number for resolving 15-150km wavelengths) along the SWOT swath, we have tested four instrument platforms: Pressure-Inverted-Echo-Sounder (PIES), Underway-Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (UCTD), instrumented mooring, and underwater glider. In the context of the OSSE, we found that for the target region and for SSH scales 15-70km, the PIES was an unsuitable tool; the slowness of a single-UCTD leads to significant aliasing by high-frequency motions at short wavelengths below ~30 km; an array of station-keeping gliders can potentially meet the requirement; and an array of moorings is the most effective system among the four tested instruments in meeting the mission’s requirement. Results shown here warrant a prelaunch field campaign to further test the performance of station-keeping gliders. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology American Meteorological Society

AN OBSERVING SYSTEM SIMULATION EXPERIMENT FOR THE CALIBRATION AND VALIDATION OF THE SURFACE WATER AND OCEAN TOPOGRAPHY SEA SURFACE HEIGHT MEASUREMENT USING IN-SITU PLATFORMS

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0426
D.O.I.
10.1175/JTECH-D-17-0076.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe wavenumber spectrum of sea surface height (SSH) is an important indicator of the dynamics of the ocean interior. While it has been well-studied at mesoscale wavelengths and longer, using both in-situ oceanographic measurements and satellite altimetry, the SSH wavenumber spectrum remains largely unknown for wavelengths less than ~70km. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission aims to resolve the SSH wavenumber spectrum at 15-150km wavelengths, which is specified as one of the mission requirements. The mission calibration and validation (CalVal) requires the ground-truth of a synoptic SSH field resolving the targeted wavelengths, but no existing observational network is able to fulfill the task. We use a high-resolution global ocean simulation to conduct an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) to identify the suitable oceanographic in-situ measurements for SWOT SSH-CalVal. After fixing 20 measuring locations (the minimum number for resolving 15-150km wavelengths) along the SWOT swath, we have tested four instrument platforms: Pressure-Inverted-Echo-Sounder (PIES), Underway-Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (UCTD), instrumented mooring, and underwater glider. In the context of the OSSE, we found that for the target region and for SSH scales 15-70km, the PIES was an unsuitable tool; the slowness of a single-UCTD leads to significant aliasing by high-frequency motions at short wavelengths below ~30 km; an array of station-keeping gliders can potentially meet the requirement; and an array of moorings is the most effective system among the four tested instruments in meeting the mission’s requirement. Results shown here warrant a prelaunch field campaign to further test the performance of station-keeping gliders.

Journal

Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic TechnologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Dec 26, 2017

References

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