An Investigation of the Influences of Mesoscale Ocean Eddies on Tropical Cyclone Intensities

An Investigation of the Influences of Mesoscale Ocean Eddies on Tropical Cyclone Intensities AbstractThe impact of mesoscale ocean eddies on tropical cyclone intensities is investigated based on a combination of observations and atmosphere–ocean coupling simulations. A statistical analysis reveals that the tropical cyclone–eddy interactions occur at very high frequencies; over 90% of the recorded tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific have encountered ocean eddies from 2002 to 2011. The chances of confronting a cold core eddy (CCE) are slightly larger than confronting a warm core eddy (WCE). The observational sea surface temperature data have statistically evidenced that CCEs tend to promote the sea surface temperature decrease caused by tropical cyclones while WCEs tend to restrain such ocean responses. The roles of CCEs are statistically more significant than those of WCEs in modulating the sea surface temperature response. It is therefore proposed that CCEs should be paid no less attention than WCEs during the TC–ocean interaction process. The CCE-induced changes in sea surface temperature decreases are observed to be more remarkable for more intense and slower-moving tropical cyclones and for thinner depth of mixed layers. A set of numerical experiments reveal that the effects of ocean eddies are positively related to their strengths and storm intensities, and the eddy feedback is less pronounced when the eddy is located at one side of storm tracks than right below the tropical cyclone center. The eddy-induced moisture disequilibrium sooner vanishes after the departure of tropical cyclones. The intensity recoveries last for 1–2 days because of the dependence of surface enthalpy fluxes on surface winds. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Monthly Weather Review American Meteorological Society

An Investigation of the Influences of Mesoscale Ocean Eddies on Tropical Cyclone Intensities

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0493
eISSN
1520-0493
D.O.I.
10.1175/MWR-D-16-0253.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe impact of mesoscale ocean eddies on tropical cyclone intensities is investigated based on a combination of observations and atmosphere–ocean coupling simulations. A statistical analysis reveals that the tropical cyclone–eddy interactions occur at very high frequencies; over 90% of the recorded tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific have encountered ocean eddies from 2002 to 2011. The chances of confronting a cold core eddy (CCE) are slightly larger than confronting a warm core eddy (WCE). The observational sea surface temperature data have statistically evidenced that CCEs tend to promote the sea surface temperature decrease caused by tropical cyclones while WCEs tend to restrain such ocean responses. The roles of CCEs are statistically more significant than those of WCEs in modulating the sea surface temperature response. It is therefore proposed that CCEs should be paid no less attention than WCEs during the TC–ocean interaction process. The CCE-induced changes in sea surface temperature decreases are observed to be more remarkable for more intense and slower-moving tropical cyclones and for thinner depth of mixed layers. A set of numerical experiments reveal that the effects of ocean eddies are positively related to their strengths and storm intensities, and the eddy feedback is less pronounced when the eddy is located at one side of storm tracks than right below the tropical cyclone center. The eddy-induced moisture disequilibrium sooner vanishes after the departure of tropical cyclones. The intensity recoveries last for 1–2 days because of the dependence of surface enthalpy fluxes on surface winds.

Journal

Monthly Weather ReviewAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 4, 2017

References

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