AMS HeadquartersNow and Into the Future

AMS HeadquartersNow and Into the Future from headquarters For four decades the AMS has been headquartered As previously reported (see "From Headquarters" at 45 Beacon Street in Boston, the third Harrison Gray in the April 2000 Bulletin), in January of 2000 the Otis House. Built in 1806 to serve as the residence for Council approved renovation of the Carriage House, Otis while he was the mayor of Boston, the house has which is attached to the main structure, so that it can a rich history and is a historically protected structure. be used by the expanding publications staff. The Car- riage House renovations were completed this summer The last major renovation to the main house was car- (see photos) and staff members began using this very ried out in 1959-60, in preparation for the Society comfortable and efficient space in August. The com- pleted Carriage House renovation is a critical compo- nent of the plan for work on the main Headquarters building since it provides the additional space neces- sary to allow portions of the main building to be va- cated while work is being done in them. As with the Carriage House renovation, the work on the main building will be financed by using the building fund portion of the Society's reserve fund, which was es- tablished many years ago for precisely this sort of pur- pose. Through prudent investment over the past two decades it is now sufficient to cover the costs. The next few years will not be easy on the staff as they Fig. 1. View of mezzanine space in Carriage House, which serves as work spaces for four staff members. The original timber accommodate the work being done, but we look for- rafters, roof, and brick walls are clearly visible. ward to the completed renovation that will provide the means for more efficient service to the membership in parallel with the Society's stewardship of the important offices to be moved there (see Bulletin, 41,507). Most historical building we call AMS Headquarters. • of the current physical systems in the house (electri- cal, plumbing, heating/cooling, and fire protection) date back to that major renovation with only minor repairs and updates in the intervening years. After a year-long study of the facility's needs now and in the future, the Council voted at its meeting in Albuquerque last January to commit to retaining the 45 Beacon Street property as AMS Headquarters. To do this, a major renovation of the facilities is required to modernize its systems and carry out needed resto- ration of the interior. This will be a multiyear project done in phases so that the building can continue serv- ing as the Society's headquarters during the renova- tion. Planning for this renovation and restoration is Fig. 2. View of main floor of the Carriage House, with desk well underway, but the complexities associated with space for nine staff members. Again, the original brick walls are installing modern systems into a historical structure, clearly visible in the historic "shell" of the building. All cabling while at the same time restoring it to be closer to its and physical system components have been run under the floor original character, will mean that the planning stage will or hidden in the floor of the mezzanine, which "floats" in the center extend into 2002 before actual construction can begin. of the space. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 219 7 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

AMS HeadquartersNow and Into the Future

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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-82.10.2271
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Abstract

from headquarters For four decades the AMS has been headquartered As previously reported (see "From Headquarters" at 45 Beacon Street in Boston, the third Harrison Gray in the April 2000 Bulletin), in January of 2000 the Otis House. Built in 1806 to serve as the residence for Council approved renovation of the Carriage House, Otis while he was the mayor of Boston, the house has which is attached to the main structure, so that it can a rich history and is a historically protected structure. be used by the expanding publications staff. The Car- riage House renovations were completed this summer The last major renovation to the main house was car- (see photos) and staff members began using this very ried out in 1959-60, in preparation for the Society comfortable and efficient space in August. The com- pleted Carriage House renovation is a critical compo- nent of the plan for work on the main Headquarters building since it provides the additional space neces- sary to allow portions of the main building to be va- cated while work is being done in them. As with the Carriage House renovation, the work on the main building will be financed by using the building fund portion of the Society's reserve fund, which was es- tablished many years ago for precisely this sort of pur- pose. Through prudent investment over the past two decades it is now sufficient to cover the costs. The next few years will not be easy on the staff as they Fig. 1. View of mezzanine space in Carriage House, which serves as work spaces for four staff members. The original timber accommodate the work being done, but we look for- rafters, roof, and brick walls are clearly visible. ward to the completed renovation that will provide the means for more efficient service to the membership in parallel with the Society's stewardship of the important offices to be moved there (see Bulletin, 41,507). Most historical building we call AMS Headquarters. • of the current physical systems in the house (electri- cal, plumbing, heating/cooling, and fire protection) date back to that major renovation with only minor repairs and updates in the intervening years. After a year-long study of the facility's needs now and in the future, the Council voted at its meeting in Albuquerque last January to commit to retaining the 45 Beacon Street property as AMS Headquarters. To do this, a major renovation of the facilities is required to modernize its systems and carry out needed resto- ration of the interior. This will be a multiyear project done in phases so that the building can continue serv- ing as the Society's headquarters during the renova- tion. Planning for this renovation and restoration is Fig. 2. View of main floor of the Carriage House, with desk well underway, but the complexities associated with space for nine staff members. Again, the original brick walls are installing modern systems into a historical structure, clearly visible in the historic "shell" of the building. All cabling while at the same time restoring it to be closer to its and physical system components have been run under the floor original character, will mean that the planning stage will or hidden in the floor of the mezzanine, which "floats" in the center extend into 2002 before actual construction can begin. of the space. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 219 7

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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