AMS Educational Initiatives Expansion

AMS Educational Initiatives Expansion editorial Partnerships with other organizations and agencies are AMS promotion of primary and secondary school education vital to the success of these education initiatives. Already, will expand dramatically as a result of a recent five-year the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for (NOAA) has provided substantial assistance for two-week Project ATMOSPHERE. The $2.86 million award heralds workshops for precollege teachers at the National Weather the establishment of AMS education programs on a national Service Training Center in Kansas City, Missouri. The 1991 level to foster the teaching of meteorological topics across AMS/NOAA workshop was held 23 July-3 August with 24 the curriculum in grades K-12. teachers from 19 states in attendance. Other workshops for The NSF award builds on the earlier commitment by AMS AERAs are scheduled in subsequent summers at Boulder, of $300,000 to this effort, as announced in the May 1990 Colorado, and Norman, Oklahoma. They will be conducted editorial in the Bulletin. The involvement and hard work of in cooperation with research, operational, and academic dedicated volunteers and AMS staff were instrumental in organizations at these locations. Further partnerships in- obtaining the award. cluding working relationships with the private sector are A national network of Atmospheric Education Resource being planned. Agents (AERAs) is one of two major Project ATMOSPHERE components. AERAs are master precollege teachers en- gaged in special leadership roles in their local and state educational systems and teacher associations. They (a) act as regional points of contact for teachers who are seeking The $2.86 million award heralds the information on atmospheric science topics, (b) function as establishment of AMS education liaison between teachers and teacher organizations, schools, programs on a national level to foster and organizations of atmospheric science and related pro- fessional communities, (c) represent the Society, as appro- the teaching of meteorological topics priate, at teacher workshops, professional meetings, and across the curriculum in grades K-12. educational conferences for the purposes of information dissemination, (d) serve on advisory panels for the Society's precollege educational initiatives, and (e) work with Society staff and members to develop and implement instructional The maximum potential of AMS contributions to precollege resource materials. education can be realized only with the extensive involve- Twenty-nine states are already represented by 48 teach- ment of AMS membership. Participation of volunteers has ers. The NSF funding of Project ATMOSPHERE will enable been the foundation for AMS achievements since 1919, teachers in all 50 states to participate in the program. when the Society was formed. The framework and basic The other major component of Project ATMOSPHERE is support for the AMS education initiatives are now in place to the development and dissemination of scientifically accu- enable volunteers anywhere in the country to contribute to rate, up-to-date, and instructional^ sound resource materi- and derive the rewards of supporting science education and als for teachers. These materials will include papers on working for the future of our country. scientific topics, periodic newsletter and information pack- Information on how to become involved will be published ets, and single-topic instructional materials. Atmospheric in future issues of the Bulletin. Individuals and local AMS scientists will be invited to help with the development of chapters can make their interests known now by writing these resource materials by preparing reference papers directly to the AMS Education Program in Washington, D.C. and, as appropriate, by working on final products in coopera- (located at 1701 KStreet N.W., Suite300, Washington, D.C. tion with master teachers and curriculum specialists. Mate- 20006). A special symposium on AMS educational issues rials produced in the project will be distributed through will be held 6- 7 January at the 1992 AMS Annual Meeting in teacher workshops arranged by AERAs and through direct Atlanta, Georgia. mailings. The NSF grant has made it possible to support an AMS education office in Washington, D.C., to coordinate educa- DAVI D D . HOUGHTON tion program activities and facilitate the involvement of AMS AM S COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES volunteers including members of the Education and Human DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY Resources Commission. On behalf of the Commission, I UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON welcome Dr. Ira Geer as full-time director of this education MADISON , WL 53706 office and the education initiatives program. Bulletin American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

AMS Educational Initiatives Expansion

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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-72.10.1551
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Abstract

editorial Partnerships with other organizations and agencies are AMS promotion of primary and secondary school education vital to the success of these education initiatives. Already, will expand dramatically as a result of a recent five-year the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for (NOAA) has provided substantial assistance for two-week Project ATMOSPHERE. The $2.86 million award heralds workshops for precollege teachers at the National Weather the establishment of AMS education programs on a national Service Training Center in Kansas City, Missouri. The 1991 level to foster the teaching of meteorological topics across AMS/NOAA workshop was held 23 July-3 August with 24 the curriculum in grades K-12. teachers from 19 states in attendance. Other workshops for The NSF award builds on the earlier commitment by AMS AERAs are scheduled in subsequent summers at Boulder, of $300,000 to this effort, as announced in the May 1990 Colorado, and Norman, Oklahoma. They will be conducted editorial in the Bulletin. The involvement and hard work of in cooperation with research, operational, and academic dedicated volunteers and AMS staff were instrumental in organizations at these locations. Further partnerships in- obtaining the award. cluding working relationships with the private sector are A national network of Atmospheric Education Resource being planned. Agents (AERAs) is one of two major Project ATMOSPHERE components. AERAs are master precollege teachers en- gaged in special leadership roles in their local and state educational systems and teacher associations. They (a) act as regional points of contact for teachers who are seeking The $2.86 million award heralds the information on atmospheric science topics, (b) function as establishment of AMS education liaison between teachers and teacher organizations, schools, programs on a national level to foster and organizations of atmospheric science and related pro- fessional communities, (c) represent the Society, as appro- the teaching of meteorological topics priate, at teacher workshops, professional meetings, and across the curriculum in grades K-12. educational conferences for the purposes of information dissemination, (d) serve on advisory panels for the Society's precollege educational initiatives, and (e) work with Society staff and members to develop and implement instructional The maximum potential of AMS contributions to precollege resource materials. education can be realized only with the extensive involve- Twenty-nine states are already represented by 48 teach- ment of AMS membership. Participation of volunteers has ers. The NSF funding of Project ATMOSPHERE will enable been the foundation for AMS achievements since 1919, teachers in all 50 states to participate in the program. when the Society was formed. The framework and basic The other major component of Project ATMOSPHERE is support for the AMS education initiatives are now in place to the development and dissemination of scientifically accu- enable volunteers anywhere in the country to contribute to rate, up-to-date, and instructional^ sound resource materi- and derive the rewards of supporting science education and als for teachers. These materials will include papers on working for the future of our country. scientific topics, periodic newsletter and information pack- Information on how to become involved will be published ets, and single-topic instructional materials. Atmospheric in future issues of the Bulletin. Individuals and local AMS scientists will be invited to help with the development of chapters can make their interests known now by writing these resource materials by preparing reference papers directly to the AMS Education Program in Washington, D.C. and, as appropriate, by working on final products in coopera- (located at 1701 KStreet N.W., Suite300, Washington, D.C. tion with master teachers and curriculum specialists. Mate- 20006). A special symposium on AMS educational issues rials produced in the project will be distributed through will be held 6- 7 January at the 1992 AMS Annual Meeting in teacher workshops arranged by AERAs and through direct Atlanta, Georgia. mailings. The NSF grant has made it possible to support an AMS education office in Washington, D.C., to coordinate educa- DAVI D D . HOUGHTON tion program activities and facilitate the involvement of AMS AM S COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES volunteers including members of the Education and Human DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY Resources Commission. On behalf of the Commission, I UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON welcome Dr. Ira Geer as full-time director of this education MADISON , WL 53706 office and the education initiatives program. Bulletin American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 1, 1991

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