about our members

about our members The American Association for the Advancement of people, places, and events of history. The service will Science (AAAS) recently elected 270 of its members add more than 800 news photos daily. to the status of fellow of the organization. The mem- Users can search for a photo by entering queries on bers were recognized for their contributions to science. a who, what, when, and where basis in addition to a The new fellows will be honored at AAAS's Fellows "sounds like" search. All photos are displayed with a Forum on 14 February 1998 in Philadelphia. AMS descriptive caption and can be reproduced on a black- members and Fellows honored with the AAAS Fel- and-white printer. low distinction were Alan K. Betts, Atmospheric Subscribers to the AccuNet™/AP® Photo Archive Research; Kristina B. Katsaros, NOAA's Atlantic will receive a source book of instructions. The sub- Oceanographic Laboratory; and Syukuro Manabe, scription also includes a template of lesson plans, Frontier Research Program for Global Change. which can be incorporated into the class room. AccuWeather, Inc., of State College, Pennsylva- Four AMS members were named Fellows of the nia, recently joined efforts with the Associated Press American Geophysical Union at its Fall Meeting in (AP) to launch a new online service, the AccuNet™/ San Francisco, California, 8-12 December 1997. Fel- AP® Photo Archive. The news libraries is targeted for lows include David Halpern, Jet Propulsion Labora- educational uses through the country. Through the new tory; Eugene M. Rasmusson, University of Mary- service, K-12 and college students, as well as users at land; Friedrich Schott, Institut fur Meereskunde an public libraries, can view and print out more than der Universitat Kiel, Germany; and John A. White- 400 000 AP photos of news stories, in some cases only head, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. • minutes old, as well as thousands of pictures of the Reminiscences of Harry S. Presiden t Truman had an interest in weather Truman "nearly all my life, at least since 1906, when I went back to the farm." While President, Mr. Truman in- Harry S. Truman, President of sisted that the daily weather map be on his desk at the United States from 1945 to 8:00 a.m., seven days a week. He received the printed 1952, died in Kansas City, Mis- map most days, but on Sundays and holidays, a spe- souri , on 26 December 1972. cial map was prepared at the old Analysis Center at President Truman had been an As- 24th and M Streets. Mr. Truman was interested sociate Membe r of the American Meteorological So- enough in the maps to do some of his own analyses ciety for many years. In 1957, he gave the welcom- on them. President Truman sometimes called Dr. F. ing address to the National Conference on "Severe W. Reichelderfer, former Chief of the U.S. Weather Local Storms" of the AMS in Kansas City on 16 Bureau, for additional details on the weather. During April. At that time, he referred to Kansas City as "the one of these conversations, the President volunteered largest suburb of my home town of Independence." the comment that he wanted the weather map so that This address was published in Weatherwise in June h e could make his own forecasts "because the 1957. The cover page of that issue shows President Weather Bureau forecasts were no damn good." Truman and visiting meteorologists at the Truman Li- brary, and the photograph below, a different view, commemorates the same occasion. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 54, 44. 120 Vol. 79 , No . 1, January 1998 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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Abstract

The American Association for the Advancement of people, places, and events of history. The service will Science (AAAS) recently elected 270 of its members add more than 800 news photos daily. to the status of fellow of the organization. The mem- Users can search for a photo by entering queries on bers were recognized for their contributions to science. a who, what, when, and where basis in addition to a The new fellows will be honored at AAAS's Fellows "sounds like" search. All photos are displayed with a Forum on 14 February 1998 in Philadelphia. AMS descriptive caption and can be reproduced on a black- members and Fellows honored with the AAAS Fel- and-white printer. low distinction were Alan K. Betts, Atmospheric Subscribers to the AccuNet™/AP® Photo Archive Research; Kristina B. Katsaros, NOAA's Atlantic will receive a source book of instructions. The sub- Oceanographic Laboratory; and Syukuro Manabe, scription also includes a template of lesson plans, Frontier Research Program for Global Change. which can be incorporated into the class room. AccuWeather, Inc., of State College, Pennsylva- Four AMS members were named Fellows of the nia, recently joined efforts with the Associated Press American Geophysical Union at its Fall Meeting in (AP) to launch a new online service, the AccuNet™/ San Francisco, California, 8-12 December 1997. Fel- AP® Photo Archive. The news libraries is targeted for lows include David Halpern, Jet Propulsion Labora- educational uses through the country. Through the new tory; Eugene M. Rasmusson, University of Mary- service, K-12 and college students, as well as users at land; Friedrich Schott, Institut fur Meereskunde an public libraries, can view and print out more than der Universitat Kiel, Germany; and John A. White- 400 000 AP photos of news stories, in some cases only head, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. • minutes old, as well as thousands of pictures of the Reminiscences of Harry S. Presiden t Truman had an interest in weather Truman "nearly all my life, at least since 1906, when I went back to the farm." While President, Mr. Truman in- Harry S. Truman, President of sisted that the daily weather map be on his desk at the United States from 1945 to 8:00 a.m., seven days a week. He received the printed 1952, died in Kansas City, Mis- map most days, but on Sundays and holidays, a spe- souri , on 26 December 1972. cial map was prepared at the old Analysis Center at President Truman had been an As- 24th and M Streets. Mr. Truman was interested sociate Membe r of the American Meteorological So- enough in the maps to do some of his own analyses ciety for many years. In 1957, he gave the welcom- on them. President Truman sometimes called Dr. F. ing address to the National Conference on "Severe W. Reichelderfer, former Chief of the U.S. Weather Local Storms" of the AMS in Kansas City on 16 Bureau, for additional details on the weather. During April. At that time, he referred to Kansas City as "the one of these conversations, the President volunteered largest suburb of my home town of Independence." the comment that he wanted the weather map so that This address was published in Weatherwise in June h e could make his own forecasts "because the 1957. The cover page of that issue shows President Weather Bureau forecasts were no damn good." Truman and visiting meteorologists at the Truman Li- brary, and the photograph below, a different view, commemorates the same occasion. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 54, 44. 120 Vol. 79 , No . 1, January 1998

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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