A Pilot Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA)

A Pilot Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA) The tropical Atlantic Ocean is characterized by a large seasonal cycle around which there are climatically significant interannual and decadal timescale variations. The most pronounced of these interannual variations are equatorial warm events, somewhat similar to the El Nio events for the Pacific, and the so-called Atlantic sea surface temperature dipole. Both of these phenomena in turn may be related to El Nio-Southern Oscillation variability in the tropical Pacific and other modes of regional climatic variability in ways that are not yet fully understood. PIRATA (Pilot Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic) will address the lack of oceanic and atmospheric data in the tropical Atlantic, which limits our ability to make progress on these important climate issues. The PIRATA array consists of 12 moored Autonomous Temperature Line Acquisition System buoy sites to be occupied during the years 19972000 for monitoring the surface variables and upper-ocean thermal structure at key locations in the tropical Atlantic. Meteorological and oceanographical measurements are transmitted via satellite in real time and are available to all interested users in the research or operational communities. The total number of moorings is a compromise between the need to put out a large enough array for a long enough period of time to gain fundamentally new insights into coupled oceanatmosphere interactions in the region, while at the same time recognizing the practical constraints of resource limitations in terms of funding, ship time, and personnel. Seen as a pilot Global Ocean Observing System/Global Climate Observing System experiment, PIRATA contributes to monitoring the tropical Atlantic in real time and anticipates a comprehensive observing system that could be operational in the region for the 2000s. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/a-pilot-research-moored-array-in-the-tropical-atlantic-pirata-DeLw6cWDX6
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477(1998)079<2019:APRMAI>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The tropical Atlantic Ocean is characterized by a large seasonal cycle around which there are climatically significant interannual and decadal timescale variations. The most pronounced of these interannual variations are equatorial warm events, somewhat similar to the El Nio events for the Pacific, and the so-called Atlantic sea surface temperature dipole. Both of these phenomena in turn may be related to El Nio-Southern Oscillation variability in the tropical Pacific and other modes of regional climatic variability in ways that are not yet fully understood. PIRATA (Pilot Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic) will address the lack of oceanic and atmospheric data in the tropical Atlantic, which limits our ability to make progress on these important climate issues. The PIRATA array consists of 12 moored Autonomous Temperature Line Acquisition System buoy sites to be occupied during the years 19972000 for monitoring the surface variables and upper-ocean thermal structure at key locations in the tropical Atlantic. Meteorological and oceanographical measurements are transmitted via satellite in real time and are available to all interested users in the research or operational communities. The total number of moorings is a compromise between the need to put out a large enough array for a long enough period of time to gain fundamentally new insights into coupled oceanatmosphere interactions in the region, while at the same time recognizing the practical constraints of resource limitations in terms of funding, ship time, and personnel. Seen as a pilot Global Ocean Observing System/Global Climate Observing System experiment, PIRATA contributes to monitoring the tropical Atlantic in real time and anticipates a comprehensive observing system that could be operational in the region for the 2000s.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 1, 1998

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial