A Look Back on Two Decades of Doppler Sodar Comparison Studies

A Look Back on Two Decades of Doppler Sodar Comparison Studies This paper is a compilation of the results obtained from various Doppler sodar comparison experiments conducted over the last 20 years. These studies have attempted to quantify the uncertainties in sodar-derived values of the horizontal wind speed, wind direction, standard deviation of the vertical wind speed w, and standard deviation of the horizontal wind direction . Doppler sodar configurations examined in these studies included bistatic, monostatic, and phased array. In most cases, reference measurements used for comparison were made by tower-based in situ sensors. Many investigators have used simple linear regressions and other statistical measures such as the correlation coefficient, bias (mean difference), comparability (root-mean-square difference), and precision (standard deviation) in an attempt to quantify those errors. The sodar-derived wind speed and wind direction are highly correlated against reference measurements (~ 0.92) with a precision of 1.06 m s1 and 21.5, respectively, for the entire dataset. Correlations of sodar-derived values of w were not quite as good (~ 0.81) with an average precision of 0.18 m s1. Past studies have shown that w accuracies vary significantly from day (convective conditions) to night (stable conditions). Very few data values were available for , which had a poor correlation of 0.57 and a precision of 10.7. The conclusions from many of these studies have shown that Doppler sodars can accurately obtain the mean wind speed and wind direction. Values of w have larger uncertainties, while estimates of have errors that are considered unacceptable for any practical use. Much of the observed scatter in sodar wind measurements can be attributed to a number of factors. These include, but are not limited to, instrument configuration, spatiotemporal variability, noise, and processing techniques. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

A Look Back on Two Decades of Doppler Sodar Comparison Studies

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/a-look-back-on-two-decades-of-doppler-sodar-comparison-studies-jZYae0zByp
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477(1997)078<0651:ALBOTD>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper is a compilation of the results obtained from various Doppler sodar comparison experiments conducted over the last 20 years. These studies have attempted to quantify the uncertainties in sodar-derived values of the horizontal wind speed, wind direction, standard deviation of the vertical wind speed w, and standard deviation of the horizontal wind direction . Doppler sodar configurations examined in these studies included bistatic, monostatic, and phased array. In most cases, reference measurements used for comparison were made by tower-based in situ sensors. Many investigators have used simple linear regressions and other statistical measures such as the correlation coefficient, bias (mean difference), comparability (root-mean-square difference), and precision (standard deviation) in an attempt to quantify those errors. The sodar-derived wind speed and wind direction are highly correlated against reference measurements (~ 0.92) with a precision of 1.06 m s1 and 21.5, respectively, for the entire dataset. Correlations of sodar-derived values of w were not quite as good (~ 0.81) with an average precision of 0.18 m s1. Past studies have shown that w accuracies vary significantly from day (convective conditions) to night (stable conditions). Very few data values were available for , which had a poor correlation of 0.57 and a precision of 10.7. The conclusions from many of these studies have shown that Doppler sodars can accurately obtain the mean wind speed and wind direction. Values of w have larger uncertainties, while estimates of have errors that are considered unacceptable for any practical use. Much of the observed scatter in sodar wind measurements can be attributed to a number of factors. These include, but are not limited to, instrument configuration, spatiotemporal variability, noise, and processing techniques.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 11, 1997

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial