A Critical Review of the Australian Experience in Cloud Seeding

A Critical Review of the Australian Experience in Cloud Seeding From 1947 to 1994 a number of cloud-seeding experiments were done in Australia based on the static cloud-seeding hypothesis. A critical analysis of these successive cloud-seeding experiments, coupled with microphysical observations of the clouds, showed that the static cloud-seeding hypothesis is not effective in enhancing winter rainfall in the plains area of Australia. However, there is evidence to suggest that cloud seeding is effective for limited meteorological conditions in stratiform clouds undergoing orographic uplift. In particular, two successive experiments in Tasmania show strong statistical evidence for rainfall enhancement when cloud-top temperatures are between 10 and 12C in a southwesterly stream. The evidence for similar effects on the Australian mainland is more controversial. In the summer rainfall regions of northern Australia, the extreme rainfall variability makes it impossible to design a statistical experiment that can to be evaluated in a reasonable time using currently available techniques. Rainfall enhancement in these regions remains inconclusive. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

A Critical Review of the Australian Experience in Cloud Seeding

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477(1997)078<0239:ACROTA>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

From 1947 to 1994 a number of cloud-seeding experiments were done in Australia based on the static cloud-seeding hypothesis. A critical analysis of these successive cloud-seeding experiments, coupled with microphysical observations of the clouds, showed that the static cloud-seeding hypothesis is not effective in enhancing winter rainfall in the plains area of Australia. However, there is evidence to suggest that cloud seeding is effective for limited meteorological conditions in stratiform clouds undergoing orographic uplift. In particular, two successive experiments in Tasmania show strong statistical evidence for rainfall enhancement when cloud-top temperatures are between 10 and 12C in a southwesterly stream. The evidence for similar effects on the Australian mainland is more controversial. In the summer rainfall regions of northern Australia, the extreme rainfall variability makes it impossible to design a statistical experiment that can to be evaluated in a reasonable time using currently available techniques. Rainfall enhancement in these regions remains inconclusive.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Feb 12, 1997

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