75 YEARS AGO

75 YEARS AGO ment in the context of near-real-time utilization and podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/quikscat / and http:// presented some preliminary scatterometer high wind winds.jpl.nasa.go—Fiona Horsfall. speed and rain effect research. Near-real-time ocean surface wind graphics using On 20 July 2000, the chapter was honored to have win d barb notation can be seen at http:// Steven Leatherman from the International Hurricane Center (IHC), Florida International University, as a manati.wwb.noaa.gov/quikscat/. guest speaker at the July meeting, held at the National Further information on the QuikSCAT/SeaWinds Hurricane Center/Tropical Prediction Center, NOAA. mission from NASA/JPL can be found at http:// Anothe r Summer in St. Louis Some "man on the street" mimeographed the following as his impressions of heat in St. Louis: On top of the Railway Exchange Building, 265 feet above the street, the U.S. Weather Bureau keeps the instruments that tell us what sort of summer we have really had. From their records we learn that during the first half of July the tem- perature rose to 90° or above on every day but one; but that during the latter half there was only one day where it did reach the mark. The average of all the highest temperatures for the month was 87.4°, which is exactly normal for July. In August there were only 12 days when the temperature rose to 90° or above, but there were many days when it nearly reached that height so that the average of the highests for the month was 87.4°, just the same as for July. August, however, should normally have been one degree cooler. For September the records are not yet complete; but during the first 19 days there were 13 on which the tempera- ture went to 90° or above, and 4 on which it went above one hundred degrees. So, while the past July and August averaged about like those of other years, September 1925 was a record-breaker for heat. Sometimes "Ere noon as brass the heavens turned The cruel sun smote with an unerring aim, The sight and touch of all things baked and burned, And hot brick walls seemed shimmering into flame." To account for such hot, dry weather, we could only fall back on the ancient Greek explanation that Phaeton, son of Apollo, had teased his father into letting him drive the chariot of the sun. As the temperature rose above 100°, it was not hard to fancy that the horses were running away with the chariot and carrying the sun altogether too near the earth. After a restless night, it was perhaps a bit of a relief to see the Pleiades, the Hyades, Orion and Sirius in the eastern sky jus t before dawn suggesting the cold weather of midwinter when they are familiar to us in the evening sky. But with returning day the mercury went up again. Then on September 21st, as the sun crossed the equator, rain came, cooler weather followed, and we are glad to live in St. Louis again. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 6, 154-155. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

75 YEARS AGO

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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-81.10.2499
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Abstract

ment in the context of near-real-time utilization and podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/quikscat / and http:// presented some preliminary scatterometer high wind winds.jpl.nasa.go—Fiona Horsfall. speed and rain effect research. Near-real-time ocean surface wind graphics using On 20 July 2000, the chapter was honored to have win d barb notation can be seen at http:// Steven Leatherman from the International Hurricane Center (IHC), Florida International University, as a manati.wwb.noaa.gov/quikscat/. guest speaker at the July meeting, held at the National Further information on the QuikSCAT/SeaWinds Hurricane Center/Tropical Prediction Center, NOAA. mission from NASA/JPL can be found at http:// Anothe r Summer in St. Louis Some "man on the street" mimeographed the following as his impressions of heat in St. Louis: On top of the Railway Exchange Building, 265 feet above the street, the U.S. Weather Bureau keeps the instruments that tell us what sort of summer we have really had. From their records we learn that during the first half of July the tem- perature rose to 90° or above on every day but one; but that during the latter half there was only one day where it did reach the mark. The average of all the highest temperatures for the month was 87.4°, which is exactly normal for July. In August there were only 12 days when the temperature rose to 90° or above, but there were many days when it nearly reached that height so that the average of the highests for the month was 87.4°, just the same as for July. August, however, should normally have been one degree cooler. For September the records are not yet complete; but during the first 19 days there were 13 on which the tempera- ture went to 90° or above, and 4 on which it went above one hundred degrees. So, while the past July and August averaged about like those of other years, September 1925 was a record-breaker for heat. Sometimes "Ere noon as brass the heavens turned The cruel sun smote with an unerring aim, The sight and touch of all things baked and burned, And hot brick walls seemed shimmering into flame." To account for such hot, dry weather, we could only fall back on the ancient Greek explanation that Phaeton, son of Apollo, had teased his father into letting him drive the chariot of the sun. As the temperature rose above 100°, it was not hard to fancy that the horses were running away with the chariot and carrying the sun altogether too near the earth. After a restless night, it was perhaps a bit of a relief to see the Pleiades, the Hyades, Orion and Sirius in the eastern sky jus t before dawn suggesting the cold weather of midwinter when they are familiar to us in the evening sky. But with returning day the mercury went up again. Then on September 21st, as the sun crossed the equator, rain came, cooler weather followed, and we are glad to live in St. Louis again. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 6, 154-155. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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