75 YEARS AGO

75 YEARS AGO "And, we are also hopeful that as a result of this ex- periment long-term programs might be established that would infuse the most useful new technologies and Sever e Thunderstorm s in Southeast techniques into our daily operations." Texa s on March 2 5 and 30 , 1926 Ralph says that the investment the country is mak- ing in both weather and climate research and modern- ized weather services has brought positive results and will On March 25th and 30th, continue to provide important benefits to the public. 1926, thunderstorms accompa- "Experiments like CALJET and P AC JE T will con- nied by winds of hurricane force tinue to expand our understanding of the interac- over a limited area of southeast tion s that occur between the ocean and the Texas caused the loss of five atmosphere," said Ralph. lives, twenty-three injured, and property damage to the extent of "Mak e an Impact" Wee k to Focus o n Disaster $2,000,000. Preventio n Neither of the storms showed indications of The Federal Emergency Management Agency's tornadic action, except for the narrow path of (FEMA) Project Impact is launching its first-ever greatest destruction. No funnel-shaped cloud was "Make an Impact" week, to be held 20-2 6 May 2001. observed, and all debris lay in one direction, fro m This national event will unite all 250 Project Impact west to east, as blown by the wind. communities across the country in an effort to educate On March 25th, practically the only section Americans in their local communities about the im- that suffered damage was at Orangefield, Texas, portance of disaster prevention. where one person was killed, eight injured, and With no El Nino or La Nina this year to help give property damage estimated at $1,000,000. The shape to the flow of weather across the seas and con- greatest damage occurred in the oil field where tinents, meteorologists are finding long-term forecast- 138 derricks were blown over, the material used ing to be much more problematic than in recent years. in their construction made no difference; steel And with the recent wildfires, floods, and earthquakes derricks meeting the same fate as those built of in California, the earthquake in New York City, and wood . . . [T]he next place to feel the effects of the study linking global warming to natural disasters, the storm to any great extent was the storage yard Americans are at risk of becoming powerless against of the U.S. Shipping Board in the Sabine River. the forces of nature. . . where a tier of vessels anchored and secured That is why Project Impact is mobilizing nation- by large cables broke loose, dragging anchors wide during "Make an Impact" week, arming commu- and snapping cables as though they were threads. nities with the educational tools and resources needed The ships were soon returned to their berths with- to change the way Americans deal with natural disas- out damage. Here the path of destructive winds ters and to help communities protect themselves from was only 100 feet, just about one-third the length the devastating effects of disasters. In addition to out- of the vessels, while in the oil field the path was reach tools, Project Impact will unveil results of a na- at least one-half mile wide. tional survey being conducted to gauge how prepared On March 30th another thunderstorm of simi- Americans are against disaster. lar type moved across this section causing the The month of May marks the end of flood season, greatest damage at Beaumont, Texas, where it the middle of tornado season, and the approach of was stated that 1000 homes and business houses hurricane and wildfire seasons, making disaster pre- were damaged .. . In this city the storm was ac- vention outreach even more critical. companied by a heavy fall of hail, breaking many Project Impact operates on a common-sense dam- glass windows. age-reduction approach, basing its work and planning on three simple principles: preventative actions must be decided at the local level, private sector participa- tion is vital, and long-term efforts and investments in Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 7, 58. prevention measures are essential. In 1997, FEMA partnered with seven pilot communities across the 7 09 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

"And, we are also hopeful that as a result of this ex- periment long-term programs might be established that would infuse the most useful new technologies and Sever e Thunderstorm s in Southeast techniques into our daily operations." Texa s on March 2 5 and 30 , 1926 Ralph says that the investment the country is mak- ing in both weather and climate research and modern- ized weather services has brought positive results and will On March 25th and 30th, continue to provide important benefits to the public. 1926, thunderstorms accompa- "Experiments like CALJET and P AC JE T will con- nied by winds of hurricane force tinue to expand our understanding of the interac- over a limited area of southeast tion s that occur between the ocean and the Texas caused the loss of five atmosphere," said Ralph. lives, twenty-three injured, and property damage to the extent of "Mak e an Impact" Wee k to Focus o n Disaster $2,000,000. Preventio n Neither of the storms showed indications of The Federal Emergency Management Agency's tornadic action, except for the narrow path of (FEMA) Project Impact is launching its first-ever greatest destruction. No funnel-shaped cloud was "Make an Impact" week, to be held 20-2 6 May 2001. observed, and all debris lay in one direction, fro m This national event will unite all 250 Project Impact west to east, as blown by the wind. communities across the country in an effort to educate On March 25th, practically the only section Americans in their local communities about the im- that suffered damage was at Orangefield, Texas, portance of disaster prevention. where one person was killed, eight injured, and With no El Nino or La Nina this year to help give property damage estimated at $1,000,000. The shape to the flow of weather across the seas and con- greatest damage occurred in the oil field where tinents, meteorologists are finding long-term forecast- 138 derricks were blown over, the material used ing to be much more problematic than in recent years. in their construction made no difference; steel And with the recent wildfires, floods, and earthquakes derricks meeting the same fate as those built of in California, the earthquake in New York City, and wood . . . [T]he next place to feel the effects of the study linking global warming to natural disasters, the storm to any great extent was the storage yard Americans are at risk of becoming powerless against of the U.S. Shipping Board in the Sabine River. the forces of nature. . . where a tier of vessels anchored and secured That is why Project Impact is mobilizing nation- by large cables broke loose, dragging anchors wide during "Make an Impact" week, arming commu- and snapping cables as though they were threads. nities with the educational tools and resources needed The ships were soon returned to their berths with- to change the way Americans deal with natural disas- out damage. Here the path of destructive winds ters and to help communities protect themselves from was only 100 feet, just about one-third the length the devastating effects of disasters. In addition to out- of the vessels, while in the oil field the path was reach tools, Project Impact will unveil results of a na- at least one-half mile wide. tional survey being conducted to gauge how prepared On March 30th another thunderstorm of simi- Americans are against disaster. lar type moved across this section causing the The month of May marks the end of flood season, greatest damage at Beaumont, Texas, where it the middle of tornado season, and the approach of was stated that 1000 homes and business houses hurricane and wildfire seasons, making disaster pre- were damaged .. . In this city the storm was ac- vention outreach even more critical. companied by a heavy fall of hail, breaking many Project Impact operates on a common-sense dam- glass windows. age-reduction approach, basing its work and planning on three simple principles: preventative actions must be decided at the local level, private sector participa- tion is vital, and long-term efforts and investments in Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 7, 58. prevention measures are essential. In 1997, FEMA partnered with seven pilot communities across the 7 09 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 1, 2001

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