75 YEARS AGO

75 YEARS AGO when ice crystals split in an electric field, the strength for us, but he also found that we need to know more of charge separation depends on the content of NO . about it. His group conducted field research in two Measurements of the atmospheric electric field allow regions in northern Bavaria. For both regions, the a prediction of the probability of the generation and population was ethnically similar and also accustomed of the dissolution of stratus clouds. The modification to staying in the neighborhood, generation after gen- of atmospheric electricity parameters by solar flares eration. In one region, there was much natural radio- is seen, for example, by S. Michnowski, as an espe- activity, even more than the legal limit, in many cially important scientific problem; Reiter did prob- houses, schools, hospitals, and offices. In the other re- ably more than anybody else to improve our still gion there was none. Comparing the records of deaths incomplete understanding of it. Surprising was the fact and sicknesses from church registers and hospital pa- (later rediscovered by L. Ruhnke) that the atmospheric pers over decades and centuries, they found that there electric field in the free atmosphere under certain con- was no difference between the two regions. To inves- ditions has the same value as that at the slope of a tigate the chemical composition and the intrusion of mountain at the same altitude. aerosol particles in the lung is important, in particular for workers in atmospheric environments with work- A few remarks on Reiter's other activities: He did produced aerosols. In addition to chemical and not doubt that radioactive radiation may be dangerous 100,000 Telephone Calls Follow Hurricane Warning Rapidly increasing utilization of weather information by many business industries is resulting in requests for more special forecasts and direct ser- vice, reports the Weather Bureau of the United States Department of Agri- culture. The calls for such information by telephone and telegrams heavily tax the ability and facilities of the bureau. Many field officers respond to a hundred or more telephone calls a day under normal weather conditions and several times as many when unusual or de- structive conditions are indicated. A considerable portion of these calls re- quire special consideration and attention. There are nearly 200 field offices to which the public has personal and telephonic access, and the volume of special service that is given by this means alone is enormous. These calls come for the most part from businessmen whose interests are affected one way or another by the weather. One incident will illustrate the extent to which the telephone is used in serving the people by direct contact. Announcement has been made by the Weather Bureau of a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico which was approaching the Texas coast. The manager of the telephone com- pany in one of the coast cities reported that during the 24 hours succeeding the warning slightly more than 200,000 telephone connections were made through his office, of which number more than 100,000 were for weather information. It was necessary to assign seven operators in ad- dition to the regular force to handle the calls. Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc., 5, 135. Vol. 80, No. 9, September 7 999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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10.1175/1520-0477-80.9.1930
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Abstract

when ice crystals split in an electric field, the strength for us, but he also found that we need to know more of charge separation depends on the content of NO . about it. His group conducted field research in two Measurements of the atmospheric electric field allow regions in northern Bavaria. For both regions, the a prediction of the probability of the generation and population was ethnically similar and also accustomed of the dissolution of stratus clouds. The modification to staying in the neighborhood, generation after gen- of atmospheric electricity parameters by solar flares eration. In one region, there was much natural radio- is seen, for example, by S. Michnowski, as an espe- activity, even more than the legal limit, in many cially important scientific problem; Reiter did prob- houses, schools, hospitals, and offices. In the other re- ably more than anybody else to improve our still gion there was none. Comparing the records of deaths incomplete understanding of it. Surprising was the fact and sicknesses from church registers and hospital pa- (later rediscovered by L. Ruhnke) that the atmospheric pers over decades and centuries, they found that there electric field in the free atmosphere under certain con- was no difference between the two regions. To inves- ditions has the same value as that at the slope of a tigate the chemical composition and the intrusion of mountain at the same altitude. aerosol particles in the lung is important, in particular for workers in atmospheric environments with work- A few remarks on Reiter's other activities: He did produced aerosols. In addition to chemical and not doubt that radioactive radiation may be dangerous 100,000 Telephone Calls Follow Hurricane Warning Rapidly increasing utilization of weather information by many business industries is resulting in requests for more special forecasts and direct ser- vice, reports the Weather Bureau of the United States Department of Agri- culture. The calls for such information by telephone and telegrams heavily tax the ability and facilities of the bureau. Many field officers respond to a hundred or more telephone calls a day under normal weather conditions and several times as many when unusual or de- structive conditions are indicated. A considerable portion of these calls re- quire special consideration and attention. There are nearly 200 field offices to which the public has personal and telephonic access, and the volume of special service that is given by this means alone is enormous. These calls come for the most part from businessmen whose interests are affected one way or another by the weather. One incident will illustrate the extent to which the telephone is used in serving the people by direct contact. Announcement has been made by the Weather Bureau of a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico which was approaching the Texas coast. The manager of the telephone com- pany in one of the coast cities reported that during the 24 hours succeeding the warning slightly more than 200,000 telephone connections were made through his office, of which number more than 100,000 were for weather information. It was necessary to assign seven operators in ad- dition to the regular force to handle the calls. Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc., 5, 135. Vol. 80, No. 9, September 7 999

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 1, 1999

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