75 YEARS AGO

75 YEARS AGO things as homework, career advice, science projects, the United States' mission in Kosovo. The talk encom- and so forth, and asked that any interested members passed many interesting areas, such as the AFWA or- please volunteer. ganization under Operation Allied Force, objectives Novograd reported that he had recently completed of the campaign, impact of weather on operations, and a review of 40 years of chapter historical records and lessons learned. Some key points he brought up in- that a summary of interesting facts would be in the next cluded weather forecasting challenges of the region newsletter. due to topography, proximity to the Adriatic Sea and Carey announced that there will be an opportunity season, location of weather forces in Kosovo, and for local chapters to provide posters or abstracts on agencies supported. He also spoke highly of the sup- their activities at the AMS Annual Meeting in January. port provided by the people at AFWA' s Special Sup- The evening's guest speaker was Col. Larry Key, port Operations Branch and the modeling teams, director of operations for Headquarters Air Force especially MM5, and mentioned that Operation Allied Weather Agency, who spoke about weather support to Force occurred during a critical reengineering of air force weather support. Finally, Key pointed out just how bad the weather was for Operation Allied Force, citing figures such as a 25% mission abort rate due to weather and the fact that weather conditions were un- favorable or marginal for precision guided munitions 70% of the time. Afte r Key answered questions from members, Reductio n of Meteorological ^ Carey thanked him for his talk and presented him with Wor k in Hungary a copy of the book Climate of Nebraska. Carey announced that the topic of the next meet- ing will be "Weather Telebroadcasting"and that the chapter has commitments from local TV meteorolo- The meteorologists in Hungary have gists Jim Flowers, Mark Lee, and Ron Gerard to at- been having a hard time. The State, not tend and participate in a panel discussion. able to pay salaries, has decreased the Carey invited any interested members to take part staff of the Hungarian Meteorological in a tour of AFWA facilities immediately following Institute from 31 in 1907-1918 to 18 in the meeting.—Tammy Farrar. 1922 and 13 in 1924. No university in Hungary offers a course in meteorology; University of Alabama-Huntsville it is taught only by private teachers. Last The final meeting of the academic year for the chap- winter, owing to lack of heat, scientific ter was held on 5 May 1999. Election of new officers lectures could not be held in assembly was held for the upcoming year and faculty advisor rooms. Moreover, since Kevin Knupp announced the results: Justin Walters, they were not allowed president; Yu-Ling Wu, vice president; Alys Blair, to buy coal at the Me- treasurer; and Ryan Decker, secretary. The presenta- teorological Institute, tion for this meeting was "Modernization of the Na- the meteorologists had tional Weather Service," presented by Jeffrey Medlin, to work in half as many science and operations officer (SOO) NWS Mobile. rooms as before.—Ab- Medlin discussed such topics as the restructuring of stract from letters of the NWS on the national scale and the description of Dr. A. Rethly. the SOO program. The SOO program provides the NWS with a "liaison" between the university commu- nity and the NWS. They also implement current uni- Jjlfc Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 5, 173. versity research into the operational environment and liilflf work with the universities on collaborative research projects. A join t chapter picnic and social event of the UAH and Tennessee Valley Chapters occurred on the 24 Vol. 80, No. 12,, December 1999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

75 YEARS AGO

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American Meteorological Society
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10.1175/1520-0477-80.12.2764
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Abstract

things as homework, career advice, science projects, the United States' mission in Kosovo. The talk encom- and so forth, and asked that any interested members passed many interesting areas, such as the AFWA or- please volunteer. ganization under Operation Allied Force, objectives Novograd reported that he had recently completed of the campaign, impact of weather on operations, and a review of 40 years of chapter historical records and lessons learned. Some key points he brought up in- that a summary of interesting facts would be in the next cluded weather forecasting challenges of the region newsletter. due to topography, proximity to the Adriatic Sea and Carey announced that there will be an opportunity season, location of weather forces in Kosovo, and for local chapters to provide posters or abstracts on agencies supported. He also spoke highly of the sup- their activities at the AMS Annual Meeting in January. port provided by the people at AFWA' s Special Sup- The evening's guest speaker was Col. Larry Key, port Operations Branch and the modeling teams, director of operations for Headquarters Air Force especially MM5, and mentioned that Operation Allied Weather Agency, who spoke about weather support to Force occurred during a critical reengineering of air force weather support. Finally, Key pointed out just how bad the weather was for Operation Allied Force, citing figures such as a 25% mission abort rate due to weather and the fact that weather conditions were un- favorable or marginal for precision guided munitions 70% of the time. Afte r Key answered questions from members, Reductio n of Meteorological ^ Carey thanked him for his talk and presented him with Wor k in Hungary a copy of the book Climate of Nebraska. Carey announced that the topic of the next meet- ing will be "Weather Telebroadcasting"and that the chapter has commitments from local TV meteorolo- The meteorologists in Hungary have gists Jim Flowers, Mark Lee, and Ron Gerard to at- been having a hard time. The State, not tend and participate in a panel discussion. able to pay salaries, has decreased the Carey invited any interested members to take part staff of the Hungarian Meteorological in a tour of AFWA facilities immediately following Institute from 31 in 1907-1918 to 18 in the meeting.—Tammy Farrar. 1922 and 13 in 1924. No university in Hungary offers a course in meteorology; University of Alabama-Huntsville it is taught only by private teachers. Last The final meeting of the academic year for the chap- winter, owing to lack of heat, scientific ter was held on 5 May 1999. Election of new officers lectures could not be held in assembly was held for the upcoming year and faculty advisor rooms. Moreover, since Kevin Knupp announced the results: Justin Walters, they were not allowed president; Yu-Ling Wu, vice president; Alys Blair, to buy coal at the Me- treasurer; and Ryan Decker, secretary. The presenta- teorological Institute, tion for this meeting was "Modernization of the Na- the meteorologists had tional Weather Service," presented by Jeffrey Medlin, to work in half as many science and operations officer (SOO) NWS Mobile. rooms as before.—Ab- Medlin discussed such topics as the restructuring of stract from letters of the NWS on the national scale and the description of Dr. A. Rethly. the SOO program. The SOO program provides the NWS with a "liaison" between the university commu- nity and the NWS. They also implement current uni- Jjlfc Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 5, 173. versity research into the operational environment and liilflf work with the universities on collaborative research projects. A join t chapter picnic and social event of the UAH and Tennessee Valley Chapters occurred on the 24 Vol. 80, No. 12,, December 1999

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Dec 1, 1999

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