75 YEARS AGO

75 YEARS AGO The prize for excellence in presentation was Footprint Model" went to Susan M. O'Neill of Wash- awarded to Kathryn E. Runnalls of the University of ington State University, while special prizes for po- British Columbia, for her paper, "The Urban Heat Is- tential applicability in practical applications were land of Vancouver, BC." Jeremy E. Diem of the Uni- awarded to Traci Arthur of The Pennsylvania State versity of Arizona, and Marie K. Svensson of the University, and to Jessie Rosen of Tulane University. University of Goteborg, were joint runners-up in this The adjudication panel consisted of A. John category. Arnfield from The Ohio State University, Ingegard First place for best poster on the topic "Turbulence Eliasson from the University of Goteborg, and James Model of an Urban Landscape for Use in an Urban A. Voogt, from the University of Western Ontario. • >\ Goddard's Rocket for Exploring Upper Air Editor's Note: For the first edition of the 75 Years Ago column, the following excerpts were chosen from a full-length article that appeared in the Bulletin in its fifth year. A rocket that will travel from the earth to the moon in less than eleven hours may soon be a reality. Only one more step and such a rocket will invade the abysses of space and will make possible the invaluable scientific data from the almost unknown region of the upper atmosphere. Prof. R. H. Goddard of Clark University, who has been carrying on investiga- tions aimed at this result for the past 14 years, announced to the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science that he was now near his goal. In his earlier experiments under the auspices of the Smithsonian Institution, Professor Goddard used smokeless powder as a propelling force, but he has recently solved the problems of utilizing liquid fuel, burning it continuously and gradually in pure oxygen without overheating the combustion chamber. By this means it is possible to give the rocket a speed of 6.6 miles a second. This is all that is necessary to carry it out of range of the force of the earth's gravitation, once free of which the rocket would proceed on indefinitely until it struck some heavenly body. [. . .] The velocity of the Goddard rocket, which is propelled on the same principle as the familiar Fourth-of-July firework, depends on the velocity of the gas expelled, and on its altitude. It starts slowly and increases in speed as long as the fuel lasts for several reasons. It encounters less resistance in the thin upper atmosphere of the near vacuum of interstellar space, it carries less weight as its fuel is used, and it becomes less and less affected by the force of the earth's attraction which decreases in proportion to the square of the distance from its center of gravity.—Science Service, Dec. 31, 1923. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 5, 15-16. Vol. 80,, No. 1, January 1999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

The prize for excellence in presentation was Footprint Model" went to Susan M. O'Neill of Wash- awarded to Kathryn E. Runnalls of the University of ington State University, while special prizes for po- British Columbia, for her paper, "The Urban Heat Is- tential applicability in practical applications were land of Vancouver, BC." Jeremy E. Diem of the Uni- awarded to Traci Arthur of The Pennsylvania State versity of Arizona, and Marie K. Svensson of the University, and to Jessie Rosen of Tulane University. University of Goteborg, were joint runners-up in this The adjudication panel consisted of A. John category. Arnfield from The Ohio State University, Ingegard First place for best poster on the topic "Turbulence Eliasson from the University of Goteborg, and James Model of an Urban Landscape for Use in an Urban A. Voogt, from the University of Western Ontario. • >\ Goddard's Rocket for Exploring Upper Air Editor's Note: For the first edition of the 75 Years Ago column, the following excerpts were chosen from a full-length article that appeared in the Bulletin in its fifth year. A rocket that will travel from the earth to the moon in less than eleven hours may soon be a reality. Only one more step and such a rocket will invade the abysses of space and will make possible the invaluable scientific data from the almost unknown region of the upper atmosphere. Prof. R. H. Goddard of Clark University, who has been carrying on investiga- tions aimed at this result for the past 14 years, announced to the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science that he was now near his goal. In his earlier experiments under the auspices of the Smithsonian Institution, Professor Goddard used smokeless powder as a propelling force, but he has recently solved the problems of utilizing liquid fuel, burning it continuously and gradually in pure oxygen without overheating the combustion chamber. By this means it is possible to give the rocket a speed of 6.6 miles a second. This is all that is necessary to carry it out of range of the force of the earth's gravitation, once free of which the rocket would proceed on indefinitely until it struck some heavenly body. [. . .] The velocity of the Goddard rocket, which is propelled on the same principle as the familiar Fourth-of-July firework, depends on the velocity of the gas expelled, and on its altitude. It starts slowly and increases in speed as long as the fuel lasts for several reasons. It encounters less resistance in the thin upper atmosphere of the near vacuum of interstellar space, it carries less weight as its fuel is used, and it becomes less and less affected by the force of the earth's attraction which decreases in proportion to the square of the distance from its center of gravity.—Science Service, Dec. 31, 1923. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 5, 15-16. Vol. 80,, No. 1, January 1999

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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