75 YEARS AGO

75 YEARS AGO While many textbooks in meteorology and oceanog- plications to specific processes (e.g., moist thermody- raphy cover thermodynamics in a chapter or two, the namic processes, static stability, and ocean surface ex- authors have devoted this entire book to thermody- change), and the last discusses special topics (e.g., namics, treating atmospheres and oceans (and ex- global energy balance, climate systems, and planetary changes processes) in a consistent fashion. There are atmospheres). Each chapter includes a set of problems 14 chapters in three parts, and the first develops basic (answers included), and appendixes include notations, concepts (e.g., composition, state, first and second law, physical constants, and units. The book has been writ- and transfer processes), while the second addresses ap- ten primarily as an undergraduate text.® Hittin g th e Ball Baseball players in the Pacific Coast League, a league comprising a number of Pacific Coast teams, and the Salt Lake City team, have repeatedly demonstrated their ability to play a better game of ball in Salt Lake City than in any of the coast diamonds. This may have something to do with the other fact that the number of baseball fans in Salt Lake City bears a very close relation to the total population figures. During the baseball season, as the weekly series of games are played on one field after another, the players have persistently and repeatedly done better work in Salt Lake City, so the claim has been made by league officials, newspaper men, and other observers. The batting especially has been conspicuously better, the balls being driven a much greater distance, and at much greater speed time after time if not every time; and a much livelier game has thus resulted, other things being equal. To the meteorologist the explanation is not far to seek; the fact that the balls are knocked much far- ther in Salt Lake City may be due in a small part to the sense of exhilaration felt at this altitude, though it is due chiefly to the diminished atmospheric pressure. As the meteor flies unhampered through space, but is slowed down on striking the earth's atmosphere, so must the flying baseball go farther in the rarer atmosphere when impelled by the same impact from the bat. The ratio of difference, stated in terms of average atmospheric pressure, for San Francisco and Salt Lake City for instance, is as 29.9 is to 25.6; or in other words, all other things being equal, the ball would go about 17 per cent farther in Salt Lake City. It may be added that the number of hot balls fumbled on the infield from the bat, and the number of flies especially that are knocked outside of the ball grounds and lost, are very much greater in Salt Lake City than at any other place on the circuit, though the grounds have been officially measured and found amply large, or larger than certain other fields on the circuit. A measure of the better playing in Salt Lake City has been attributed to the exhilara- tion felt at this altitude by any one residing at sea level and sojourning at an elevation. The Salt Lake team trains in California, and spends most of its playing season at coast elevations; and while Salt Lake City elevation is only 4300 feet above the sea, it is suf- ficient to produce a noticeable effect. However, while this peppy feeling is manifested plainly in batting, base running, and fielding in spurts, according to those who have seen the men in all fields, there is an abrupt loss of efficiency in base running scrambles and other fast and prolonged plays, because the players lost their wind or become tired much quicker in Salt Lake City. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 5, 109-110. 116 9 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/ams/75-years-ago-7DM2Crv7tU
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-80.6.1169
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

While many textbooks in meteorology and oceanog- plications to specific processes (e.g., moist thermody- raphy cover thermodynamics in a chapter or two, the namic processes, static stability, and ocean surface ex- authors have devoted this entire book to thermody- change), and the last discusses special topics (e.g., namics, treating atmospheres and oceans (and ex- global energy balance, climate systems, and planetary changes processes) in a consistent fashion. There are atmospheres). Each chapter includes a set of problems 14 chapters in three parts, and the first develops basic (answers included), and appendixes include notations, concepts (e.g., composition, state, first and second law, physical constants, and units. The book has been writ- and transfer processes), while the second addresses ap- ten primarily as an undergraduate text.® Hittin g th e Ball Baseball players in the Pacific Coast League, a league comprising a number of Pacific Coast teams, and the Salt Lake City team, have repeatedly demonstrated their ability to play a better game of ball in Salt Lake City than in any of the coast diamonds. This may have something to do with the other fact that the number of baseball fans in Salt Lake City bears a very close relation to the total population figures. During the baseball season, as the weekly series of games are played on one field after another, the players have persistently and repeatedly done better work in Salt Lake City, so the claim has been made by league officials, newspaper men, and other observers. The batting especially has been conspicuously better, the balls being driven a much greater distance, and at much greater speed time after time if not every time; and a much livelier game has thus resulted, other things being equal. To the meteorologist the explanation is not far to seek; the fact that the balls are knocked much far- ther in Salt Lake City may be due in a small part to the sense of exhilaration felt at this altitude, though it is due chiefly to the diminished atmospheric pressure. As the meteor flies unhampered through space, but is slowed down on striking the earth's atmosphere, so must the flying baseball go farther in the rarer atmosphere when impelled by the same impact from the bat. The ratio of difference, stated in terms of average atmospheric pressure, for San Francisco and Salt Lake City for instance, is as 29.9 is to 25.6; or in other words, all other things being equal, the ball would go about 17 per cent farther in Salt Lake City. It may be added that the number of hot balls fumbled on the infield from the bat, and the number of flies especially that are knocked outside of the ball grounds and lost, are very much greater in Salt Lake City than at any other place on the circuit, though the grounds have been officially measured and found amply large, or larger than certain other fields on the circuit. A measure of the better playing in Salt Lake City has been attributed to the exhilara- tion felt at this altitude by any one residing at sea level and sojourning at an elevation. The Salt Lake team trains in California, and spends most of its playing season at coast elevations; and while Salt Lake City elevation is only 4300 feet above the sea, it is suf- ficient to produce a noticeable effect. However, while this peppy feeling is manifested plainly in batting, base running, and fielding in spurts, according to those who have seen the men in all fields, there is an abrupt loss of efficiency in base running scrambles and other fast and prolonged plays, because the players lost their wind or become tired much quicker in Salt Lake City. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 5, 109-110. 116 9 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off