75 YEARS AGO

75 YEARS AGO professional meteorologists, the Weather Center be- politan area. The funding has enabled the group to hire gan an alliance with Lyndon State College and its a professionally trained archivist to work on the worldwide computer and satellite weather data service. records for three years. Today NNEWC creates local weather forecasts cov- Selene Colburn, project archivist, started the jo b in ering Vermont, New Hampshire, upstate New York, September 1999 of describing and cataloguing 64 col- and adjacent areas in the United States and Canada. lections of historic material (thought to more than "The Eye on the Sky" broadcasts by meteorologists 1500 boxes), beginning at the Fairbanks Museum. Steve Maleski and Mark Breen of NNEWC are one Other collections of interest to the science community of Vermont Public Radio's most popular programs. to be processed soon include the Fairbanks Museum's Institutional Records, which document over 100 years The success of the NNEWC papers enabled the of the teaching of science to local schoolchildren; an- Fairbanks Museum to secure funding to organize and nual spring first flower and bird sightings dating back make accessible more of its holdings. The museum over 100 years; and the Museum's participation in local joined together with four neighboring cultural insti- environmental issues, such as proposed Victory Bog tutions to form the St. Johnsbury Archives Collabo- rative. The National Historical Publications and Dam in the 1960s, which was never constructed. The Records Commission (NHPRC) awarded a $143, museum also holds the records of the Northeast King- 191.00 grant to the collaborative in 1999 to catalog the dom Audobon Society, a local chapter of the organiza- documentary history of the town. The NHPRC is part tion, which has met at the museum since its inception. fo the National Archives and Records Administration, Interested researchers should contact Colburn at the a federal agency based in Washington, D.C. The award Fairbanks Museum at 802-748-2372 or selene.colburn@ to the collaborative is one of the largest commitments connriver.net or through the Fairbanks Museum Web site the agency has ever granted outside of a large metro- at www.fairbanksmuseum.org. • Factors Contributing to Earthquakes A deficiency of rainfall and low barometric pressure were doubtless impor- tant factors in precipitating the earthquakes of January 7th and February 28th in New England, for anything which would tend to make the land lighter would increase the strain along the fault line. The quake of January 7th was preceded by three months of very dry weather with a deficiency of 8.1 inches of rainfall, and immediately followed by rain and a normal rainfall for that month. Then during February there was a deficiency again in rainfall and then the quake of the 28th, which was likewise followed by rain. Just before the quake of the 28th, the lowest barometric pressure for 2 years, 28.96 inches was recorded in Boston. This low moved in a northeasterly direction across New England and the Saguenay region, crossing the St. Lawrence fault. The weight of 8 inches of rainfall over all New England is computed to be 32,260,224,000 tons. No allowances for evaporation and runoff was made in this figure; yet even if these amounts were subtracted, the weight would still be several billion tons. A defi- ciency of 8 inches of rainfall, therefore, is equivalent to taking an enormous weight off New England. This, together with the extremely low barometric pressure of February 26-28, might well have been set of circumstances which "set off ' the shock of February 28th.—Excerpts from article by R. W. Sayles, Boston Herald, March 21, 1925. Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc. 6, 83. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1103 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

professional meteorologists, the Weather Center be- politan area. The funding has enabled the group to hire gan an alliance with Lyndon State College and its a professionally trained archivist to work on the worldwide computer and satellite weather data service. records for three years. Today NNEWC creates local weather forecasts cov- Selene Colburn, project archivist, started the jo b in ering Vermont, New Hampshire, upstate New York, September 1999 of describing and cataloguing 64 col- and adjacent areas in the United States and Canada. lections of historic material (thought to more than "The Eye on the Sky" broadcasts by meteorologists 1500 boxes), beginning at the Fairbanks Museum. Steve Maleski and Mark Breen of NNEWC are one Other collections of interest to the science community of Vermont Public Radio's most popular programs. to be processed soon include the Fairbanks Museum's Institutional Records, which document over 100 years The success of the NNEWC papers enabled the of the teaching of science to local schoolchildren; an- Fairbanks Museum to secure funding to organize and nual spring first flower and bird sightings dating back make accessible more of its holdings. The museum over 100 years; and the Museum's participation in local joined together with four neighboring cultural insti- environmental issues, such as proposed Victory Bog tutions to form the St. Johnsbury Archives Collabo- rative. The National Historical Publications and Dam in the 1960s, which was never constructed. The Records Commission (NHPRC) awarded a $143, museum also holds the records of the Northeast King- 191.00 grant to the collaborative in 1999 to catalog the dom Audobon Society, a local chapter of the organiza- documentary history of the town. The NHPRC is part tion, which has met at the museum since its inception. fo the National Archives and Records Administration, Interested researchers should contact Colburn at the a federal agency based in Washington, D.C. The award Fairbanks Museum at 802-748-2372 or selene.colburn@ to the collaborative is one of the largest commitments connriver.net or through the Fairbanks Museum Web site the agency has ever granted outside of a large metro- at www.fairbanksmuseum.org. • Factors Contributing to Earthquakes A deficiency of rainfall and low barometric pressure were doubtless impor- tant factors in precipitating the earthquakes of January 7th and February 28th in New England, for anything which would tend to make the land lighter would increase the strain along the fault line. The quake of January 7th was preceded by three months of very dry weather with a deficiency of 8.1 inches of rainfall, and immediately followed by rain and a normal rainfall for that month. Then during February there was a deficiency again in rainfall and then the quake of the 28th, which was likewise followed by rain. Just before the quake of the 28th, the lowest barometric pressure for 2 years, 28.96 inches was recorded in Boston. This low moved in a northeasterly direction across New England and the Saguenay region, crossing the St. Lawrence fault. The weight of 8 inches of rainfall over all New England is computed to be 32,260,224,000 tons. No allowances for evaporation and runoff was made in this figure; yet even if these amounts were subtracted, the weight would still be several billion tons. A defi- ciency of 8 inches of rainfall, therefore, is equivalent to taking an enormous weight off New England. This, together with the extremely low barometric pressure of February 26-28, might well have been set of circumstances which "set off ' the shock of February 28th.—Excerpts from article by R. W. Sayles, Boston Herald, March 21, 1925. Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc. 6, 83. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1103

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 1, 2000

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