75 Years Ago

75 Years Ago ecutive magazine to recognize information/communi- are up to 100 times better than those taken by previ- cations technology projects that have made excep- ous satellites. Using this new information, scientists at NASA's tional contributions to mission accomplishment, cost Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California, effectiveness, and service to the public. can generate comprehensive maps of Arctic sea ice Scientists Cut through the Clouds to the thickness for the first time. "Before we knew only the Shifting Arctic Ice extent of the ice cover," said Ronald Kwok, JPL prin- cipal investigator of a project called Sea Ice Thickness NASA researchers have new insights into the mys- Derived From High Resolution Radar Imagery. "We teries of Arctic sea ice, thanks to the unique abilities of Canada's RADARS A T satellite. The Arctic is the also knew that the sea ice extent had decreased over smallest of the world's four oceans, but it may play a the last 20 years, but we knew very little about ice large role in helping scientists monitor earth's climate thickness." shifts. "Since sea ice is very thin, about 10 feet (3 m) or less," Using RADARSAT's special sensors to take im- Kwok explained, "it is very sensitive to climate change." ages at night and to peer through clouds, NASA re- Until now, observations of polar sea ice thickness searchers can now see the complete ice cover of the have been available for specific areas, but not for the Arctic. This allows tracking of any shifts and changes, entire polar region. in unprecedented detail, over the course of an entire The new radar mapping technique has also given winter. The radar-generated, high-resolution images scientists a close look at how the sea ice cover grows A Wintery October Mr. John R. Weeks, Meteorologist, U.S. Weather Bureau, Binghamton, N.Y., has sent a list of twenty-five records for his station broken by the weather of Octo- ber, 1925. The period of record is generally 30-35 years. Much of the northern and eastern portion of the country was similarly afflicted. From Helena, Montana, for example, comes a record of over two feet of snowfall in October, after one foot in September. At Binghamton, the past October was the coldest, cloudiest, stormiest, and snowi- est October on record at that station. On one day the temperature did not even get as high as the freezing point. But on another the 8 A.M. temperature was 70, the highest known for this hour in October. There were 24 cloudy days and but two clear ones. Precipitation fell on 23 days and snow on 10. The daily range of temperature was the smallest on record. Mr. C. J. Root's Illinois Section report (Climat'l Data) for October shows even worse conditions in Illinois. Corn was practically all safe by the time of the killing frost of Oct. 10, but unharvested apples and potatoes were frozen towards the end of the month, "with temperatures near zero in places and snow depths up to 6 inches." On the 29th the maximum temperature at Springfield was but 22.8°F, as compared with a previous low daily maximum of 37.5°F in the 47 years of record. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 6, 172. 2700 Vol. 81, No. 7 7, November 2000 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

75 Years Ago

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/ams/75-years-ago-0x0kBB140h
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-81.11.2702
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ecutive magazine to recognize information/communi- are up to 100 times better than those taken by previ- cations technology projects that have made excep- ous satellites. Using this new information, scientists at NASA's tional contributions to mission accomplishment, cost Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California, effectiveness, and service to the public. can generate comprehensive maps of Arctic sea ice Scientists Cut through the Clouds to the thickness for the first time. "Before we knew only the Shifting Arctic Ice extent of the ice cover," said Ronald Kwok, JPL prin- cipal investigator of a project called Sea Ice Thickness NASA researchers have new insights into the mys- Derived From High Resolution Radar Imagery. "We teries of Arctic sea ice, thanks to the unique abilities of Canada's RADARS A T satellite. The Arctic is the also knew that the sea ice extent had decreased over smallest of the world's four oceans, but it may play a the last 20 years, but we knew very little about ice large role in helping scientists monitor earth's climate thickness." shifts. "Since sea ice is very thin, about 10 feet (3 m) or less," Using RADARSAT's special sensors to take im- Kwok explained, "it is very sensitive to climate change." ages at night and to peer through clouds, NASA re- Until now, observations of polar sea ice thickness searchers can now see the complete ice cover of the have been available for specific areas, but not for the Arctic. This allows tracking of any shifts and changes, entire polar region. in unprecedented detail, over the course of an entire The new radar mapping technique has also given winter. The radar-generated, high-resolution images scientists a close look at how the sea ice cover grows A Wintery October Mr. John R. Weeks, Meteorologist, U.S. Weather Bureau, Binghamton, N.Y., has sent a list of twenty-five records for his station broken by the weather of Octo- ber, 1925. The period of record is generally 30-35 years. Much of the northern and eastern portion of the country was similarly afflicted. From Helena, Montana, for example, comes a record of over two feet of snowfall in October, after one foot in September. At Binghamton, the past October was the coldest, cloudiest, stormiest, and snowi- est October on record at that station. On one day the temperature did not even get as high as the freezing point. But on another the 8 A.M. temperature was 70, the highest known for this hour in October. There were 24 cloudy days and but two clear ones. Precipitation fell on 23 days and snow on 10. The daily range of temperature was the smallest on record. Mr. C. J. Root's Illinois Section report (Climat'l Data) for October shows even worse conditions in Illinois. Corn was practically all safe by the time of the killing frost of Oct. 10, but unharvested apples and potatoes were frozen towards the end of the month, "with temperatures near zero in places and snow depths up to 6 inches." On the 29th the maximum temperature at Springfield was but 22.8°F, as compared with a previous low daily maximum of 37.5°F in the 47 years of record. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 6, 172. 2700 Vol. 81, No. 7 7, November 2000

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial