75 YEARS AGO

75 YEARS AGO in the year since publication, and given online evolu- to most aspects of the U.S. tropical cyclone hazard and tion, most links will likely be either extinct, moved, as such may be a handy resource for the educated lay- or significantly altered in content within four or five person, legislator, emergency manager, or nascent years. This will render a significant portion of this tropical meteorologist wishing to have hurricane in- book almost useless in a very short time, relative to formation at hand. Its greatest value, however, is an the many years most weather-related books tend to unparalleled richness of insight into the historical in- reside in libraries before being discarded. fluence of many individual storms and of the men and women who have studied them. Those aspects are The layout of this volume has jolting choppiness sorely deserving of a book of their own: but in the throughout, with little continuity between chapters and meantime, this work makes a fine surrogate for that from one subtopic to the next. The seemingly haphaz- purpose. It is severely handicapped, however, by a ard format appears to result largely from constraints rough, scattershot format wholly unsuited to cover-to- imposed by a publisher's template for the series as a cover reading.—Roger Edwards. whole. The organizational style may suffice for other volumes in the series—mostly unrelated sociopolitical tomes on subjects like hate crimes, AIDS, feminism, Roger Edwards is a meteorologist at the Storm Pre- and single parenting. However, the style is a poor fit diction Center in Norman, Oklahoma, with prior ser- to a meteorological resource devoid of political con- vice for the National Hurricane Center in Miami, troversy and where little discussion of social conse- Florida, and the National Severe Storms Laboratory quence is provided. Alternatively, perhaps the subject in Norman. He has witnessed, photographed, and sur- matter of hurricanes as presented is a bad fit for the veyed some of the most devastating U.S. weather series. Also, a small but noticeable quantity of typo- events in modern times, including Hurricane Andrew, graphical errors leaves the impression of sloppy editing. the 1993 Midwest floods, and the 1999 central Okla- homa F5 tornado. • The book is packed with tables and listings related Unusual Hail in East One feature of the most remarkable change from the hottest to the coldest recorded May weather in the northeastern United States, May 23 to May 25, was the occurrence of a number of extraordinary hailstorms. In the vicinity of New York City hailstones up to a length of 2 1/2 inches were measured after a fall late in the afternoon of May 23rd. Three separate storms occurred in east- I ern Long Island, where hail is an exceedingly rare phenomenon. In one house 23 windows were broken. At Montauk Point lighthouse, the keepers said it was as big as walnuts. Credible and accurate measurements of stones as big as 1 1/ 4 inches in diar neter were made. Mr. Ernest S. Clowes says, "A characteristic of the two earlier hailstorms was the towering character of the clouds, reminding me of those I saw in Syracuse, N.Y., on June 1 7, 1922, when about 4 inches of rain fell in 90 minutes." In Baltimore , along a line projected from an earlier tornado in West Virginia, near Elkins, an extraordinary q uantity of hail fell in a path about half a mile wide. There was so much ice pre- cipitated that st reet cars were blocked by it for half a day. Bull. Amer. Meteo) r. Soc., 6, 112. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 161 9 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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10.1175/1520-0477-81.7.1619
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Abstract

in the year since publication, and given online evolu- to most aspects of the U.S. tropical cyclone hazard and tion, most links will likely be either extinct, moved, as such may be a handy resource for the educated lay- or significantly altered in content within four or five person, legislator, emergency manager, or nascent years. This will render a significant portion of this tropical meteorologist wishing to have hurricane in- book almost useless in a very short time, relative to formation at hand. Its greatest value, however, is an the many years most weather-related books tend to unparalleled richness of insight into the historical in- reside in libraries before being discarded. fluence of many individual storms and of the men and women who have studied them. Those aspects are The layout of this volume has jolting choppiness sorely deserving of a book of their own: but in the throughout, with little continuity between chapters and meantime, this work makes a fine surrogate for that from one subtopic to the next. The seemingly haphaz- purpose. It is severely handicapped, however, by a ard format appears to result largely from constraints rough, scattershot format wholly unsuited to cover-to- imposed by a publisher's template for the series as a cover reading.—Roger Edwards. whole. The organizational style may suffice for other volumes in the series—mostly unrelated sociopolitical tomes on subjects like hate crimes, AIDS, feminism, Roger Edwards is a meteorologist at the Storm Pre- and single parenting. However, the style is a poor fit diction Center in Norman, Oklahoma, with prior ser- to a meteorological resource devoid of political con- vice for the National Hurricane Center in Miami, troversy and where little discussion of social conse- Florida, and the National Severe Storms Laboratory quence is provided. Alternatively, perhaps the subject in Norman. He has witnessed, photographed, and sur- matter of hurricanes as presented is a bad fit for the veyed some of the most devastating U.S. weather series. Also, a small but noticeable quantity of typo- events in modern times, including Hurricane Andrew, graphical errors leaves the impression of sloppy editing. the 1993 Midwest floods, and the 1999 central Okla- homa F5 tornado. • The book is packed with tables and listings related Unusual Hail in East One feature of the most remarkable change from the hottest to the coldest recorded May weather in the northeastern United States, May 23 to May 25, was the occurrence of a number of extraordinary hailstorms. In the vicinity of New York City hailstones up to a length of 2 1/2 inches were measured after a fall late in the afternoon of May 23rd. Three separate storms occurred in east- I ern Long Island, where hail is an exceedingly rare phenomenon. In one house 23 windows were broken. At Montauk Point lighthouse, the keepers said it was as big as walnuts. Credible and accurate measurements of stones as big as 1 1/ 4 inches in diar neter were made. Mr. Ernest S. Clowes says, "A characteristic of the two earlier hailstorms was the towering character of the clouds, reminding me of those I saw in Syracuse, N.Y., on June 1 7, 1922, when about 4 inches of rain fell in 90 minutes." In Baltimore , along a line projected from an earlier tornado in West Virginia, near Elkins, an extraordinary q uantity of hail fell in a path about half a mile wide. There was so much ice pre- cipitated that st reet cars were blocked by it for half a day. Bull. Amer. Meteo) r. Soc., 6, 112. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 161 9

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jul 1, 2000

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