50 Years Ago

50 Years Ago meteorologist, was recognized for his "excellent plan- tides; and other parameters. The Mount Waliguan site ning, development, and leadership efforts regarding will measure carbon dioxide and ozone and the afore- implementation of the WSR-88D at WSFO Phoenix." mentioned measurements. Keith Meier, meteorologist intern, Western Region The GAW system was established in 1989 by Scientific Services Division, received an award "in WMO and has combined a number of WMO's re- recognition of developing a PCGRIDS Users Manual search and monitoring activities in the field of atmo- and promoting model gridded data use in the NWS." spheric environment, including the WMO Global Ozone Observing System and the Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network. WMO Opens Observing Station in China A major milestone in the development of GAW was The first of six World Meteorological Organization the initiation in 1992 of an international project aimed (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) observing at establishing six stations of global importance in stations officially began operating in September 1994 Algeria, Argentina, Brazil, China, Indonesia, and Kenya. on Mount Waliguan, 3820 m in the Tibetan highlands. The project is financed by the United Nations Develop- The new GAW station is the highest of the six ment Programme through the Global Environment observatories and the one to have the largest facility. Facility. The Mount Waliguan GAW observing station Data collected at the GAW stations are essential to is funded jointly by the Global Environment Facility understanding the relationship between the changes and the government of China. in the composition of the atmosphere and the global regional climate and in assessing the long-range El Nino Found in the Indian Ocean atmospheric transport and deposition of potentially In an article that will appear in an upcoming issue of harmful substances over terrestrial, freshwater, and the Journal of Physical Oceanography, two research- marine ecosystems. The information will also be used ers report on their findings that link the Pacific Ocean to study the natural cycling of chemical elements in the with the Indian Ocean in an El Nino pattern. global atmosphere-ocean-biosphere system and the impacts of human activities on these elements. The research was conducted by Yves M. Tourre, a The GAW stations measure ozone; greenhouse research meteorologist at Columbia University's gases such as C0 , CFCs, CH , N 0, and water Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and professor at 2 4 2 vapor; solar and UV radiation; total aerosol load; the Western Connecticut State University, and by Warren chemical composition of rain and atmospheric par- B. White, a research oceanographer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. Tourre and White discovered an El Nino pattern in the Indian Ocean that is in lockstep with that in the Pacific Ocean. During the same periods when the Pacific warm pool migrated eastward to create the El so Nino in 1982-83 and in 1986-87, El Nino also formed in the Indian Ocean. The researchers found that El Nino-Southern Oscillation cycles in the Indian and Chicago Seminar Again Active Pacific Oceans may influence each other. On the At a meeting on December 15,1944, the Chicago other hand, dynamic processes within each ocean Seminar of the Society elected the following new appear to be different. officers:—Mr. G. Baatz, United Airlines, President; In both oceans, the warm pool in the western part Mr. I. Brunk, Weather Bureau, Vice-President; M. moves eastward along the equator. In the Pacific G. Platzman, Univ. of Chicago, Secretary-Trea- Ocean, it moves to the coast of South America, where surer; and Mr. D. Shideler, Weather Bureau, Asst. the warmest sea surface temperatures form during Secy-Treas.; Professor C.-G. Rossby addressed the El Nino. In the Indian Ocean, it moves to the central this meeting on the topic: "Proposed Reorganiza- region, where the warmest sea surface temperatures tion of the American Meteorological Society and form during the Indian El Nino. The two El Nino events Plans for Post-War Meteorology." The Seminar in both oceans are in phase. again met on January 11 and Prof. H. R. Byers Tourre and White will describe their research, analy- spoke on "South American Meteorology." On Feb. sis, and results in detail in their article, "ENSO Signals 8 Mr. Shideler spoke on "Constant Pressure Charts." in Global Upper Ocean Temperatures," which will be published in J. Phys. Oceanogr., 25, No. 3. • Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 26,8. Vol. 76, No. 1, January 1995 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

meteorologist, was recognized for his "excellent plan- tides; and other parameters. The Mount Waliguan site ning, development, and leadership efforts regarding will measure carbon dioxide and ozone and the afore- implementation of the WSR-88D at WSFO Phoenix." mentioned measurements. Keith Meier, meteorologist intern, Western Region The GAW system was established in 1989 by Scientific Services Division, received an award "in WMO and has combined a number of WMO's re- recognition of developing a PCGRIDS Users Manual search and monitoring activities in the field of atmo- and promoting model gridded data use in the NWS." spheric environment, including the WMO Global Ozone Observing System and the Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network. WMO Opens Observing Station in China A major milestone in the development of GAW was The first of six World Meteorological Organization the initiation in 1992 of an international project aimed (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) observing at establishing six stations of global importance in stations officially began operating in September 1994 Algeria, Argentina, Brazil, China, Indonesia, and Kenya. on Mount Waliguan, 3820 m in the Tibetan highlands. The project is financed by the United Nations Develop- The new GAW station is the highest of the six ment Programme through the Global Environment observatories and the one to have the largest facility. Facility. The Mount Waliguan GAW observing station Data collected at the GAW stations are essential to is funded jointly by the Global Environment Facility understanding the relationship between the changes and the government of China. in the composition of the atmosphere and the global regional climate and in assessing the long-range El Nino Found in the Indian Ocean atmospheric transport and deposition of potentially In an article that will appear in an upcoming issue of harmful substances over terrestrial, freshwater, and the Journal of Physical Oceanography, two research- marine ecosystems. The information will also be used ers report on their findings that link the Pacific Ocean to study the natural cycling of chemical elements in the with the Indian Ocean in an El Nino pattern. global atmosphere-ocean-biosphere system and the impacts of human activities on these elements. The research was conducted by Yves M. Tourre, a The GAW stations measure ozone; greenhouse research meteorologist at Columbia University's gases such as C0 , CFCs, CH , N 0, and water Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and professor at 2 4 2 vapor; solar and UV radiation; total aerosol load; the Western Connecticut State University, and by Warren chemical composition of rain and atmospheric par- B. White, a research oceanographer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. Tourre and White discovered an El Nino pattern in the Indian Ocean that is in lockstep with that in the Pacific Ocean. During the same periods when the Pacific warm pool migrated eastward to create the El so Nino in 1982-83 and in 1986-87, El Nino also formed in the Indian Ocean. The researchers found that El Nino-Southern Oscillation cycles in the Indian and Chicago Seminar Again Active Pacific Oceans may influence each other. On the At a meeting on December 15,1944, the Chicago other hand, dynamic processes within each ocean Seminar of the Society elected the following new appear to be different. officers:—Mr. G. Baatz, United Airlines, President; In both oceans, the warm pool in the western part Mr. I. Brunk, Weather Bureau, Vice-President; M. moves eastward along the equator. In the Pacific G. Platzman, Univ. of Chicago, Secretary-Trea- Ocean, it moves to the coast of South America, where surer; and Mr. D. Shideler, Weather Bureau, Asst. the warmest sea surface temperatures form during Secy-Treas.; Professor C.-G. Rossby addressed the El Nino. In the Indian Ocean, it moves to the central this meeting on the topic: "Proposed Reorganiza- region, where the warmest sea surface temperatures tion of the American Meteorological Society and form during the Indian El Nino. The two El Nino events Plans for Post-War Meteorology." The Seminar in both oceans are in phase. again met on January 11 and Prof. H. R. Byers Tourre and White will describe their research, analy- spoke on "South American Meteorology." On Feb. sis, and results in detail in their article, "ENSO Signals 8 Mr. Shideler spoke on "Constant Pressure Charts." in Global Upper Ocean Temperatures," which will be published in J. Phys. Oceanogr., 25, No. 3. • Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 26,8. Vol. 76, No. 1, January 1995

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1995

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