50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO season hurricane from the Bermuda area. However, the book is flawed with typographical errors, editing at times the author does stumble, resulting in utter- oversights, and choppy writing, as well as technical ances such as ". . . and a nationwide system called the inaccuracies. And quite obviously, the story has a Limited Fine Mesh, a grid superimposed on a map of number of holes in it; hardly avoidable due to such a the country where the corners represent data-collec- large amount of missing information. tion points. Twice a day hundreds of LFM balloons The last third of the book is rather disappointing. are released to measure ... " and talking of a fax chart Junger expended a lot of time and energy making the showing the developing storm as ".. . a tightly reader care about the crew of the Andrea Gail, yet he jammed set of barometric lines . . ." His attempts at spent the latter portion of the book describing rescue describing why storms form are rather pathetic, even attempts of other ships' crew, who readers had not to the point of ignoring the Coriolis effect (which is encountered until this point. why they spin counterclockwise). If the meteorologist- In all The Perfect Storm is a suspenseful, quick reader can neglect these oversights, then the book be- read, enjoyable in spite of the grammatical and tech- comes enjoyable. However, there is an important les- nical errors. Junger obviously cared deeply about his son here in that most of what has been learned about subjects and through his words has let the world know cyclogenesis over the past few decades has not been about the lives of men who choose to battle the sea getting out to the public and we face a great challenge for their very existence and how the sea sometimes for the years to come. wins.—Julie Burba and Stu Muench. Suspended somewhere between fact and fiction, Julie Burba is the manager of news and publicity The Perfect Storm is by no means the perfect book. for the AMS. Although it has enjoyed a consistent presence on a Stu Muench is a technical editor for the Journal of number of nonfiction bestseller lists (ranked number the Atmospheric Sciences for the AMS. • 3 on the top 40 amazon.com bestseller list for 1997), Col. Holzman Presented The Robert M. Losey Award, 1947 Established by the Institute of fornia Institute of Technology (1937-1938); and Super- Aeronautical Sciences in 1940, this vising Forecaster, U.S. Weather Bureau, at La Guardia award honors the memory of Capt. Field 1940-42. During the war, Colonel Holzman served Robert Moffatt Losey, a meteorologi- as Senior Forecaster for the U.S. Strategic Air Forces cal officer at the Air Corps, who was and had important responsibilities of a meteorological killed at Dombas, Norway, April 21, nature in connection with the bombing and invasion of 1940, while serving as an official ob- Europe. Shortly after the close of the war, he was as- server for the U.S. Army. He was the signed to handle the meteorological problems connected first officer in the service of the United States to die in with the Bikini atomic bomb experiments. His profes- World War II. For 1947, it was presented at the annual sional and technical accomplishments on this assignment meeting of the Institute on January 1948 to Col. Ben- gained him wide recognition from the Army and Navy jamin G. Holzman, U.S.A.F., "In recognition of out- personnel who were in charge of the experiment. standing contributions to the science of meteorology as In his present position, Colonel Holzman not only has applied to aeronautics." continued to make important contributions himself but also has initiated and guided many important meteoro- Colonel Holzman received his meteorological edu- logical investigations and had an important part in the cation at the California Institute of Technology, which successful formulation of the joint Weather Bureau, awarded him the degree of Master of Science. During Army, Navy, and National Advisory Committee for the period he also was Meteorologist for Eastern Air Aeronautics Thunderstorm Project. Lines (1934-1935); Meteorologist in Charge, American Air Lines (1935-36); Assistant Meteorologist, Soil Con- servation Service (1936-1940); Teaching Fellow, Cali- Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 29,218. 8 75 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

season hurricane from the Bermuda area. However, the book is flawed with typographical errors, editing at times the author does stumble, resulting in utter- oversights, and choppy writing, as well as technical ances such as ". . . and a nationwide system called the inaccuracies. And quite obviously, the story has a Limited Fine Mesh, a grid superimposed on a map of number of holes in it; hardly avoidable due to such a the country where the corners represent data-collec- large amount of missing information. tion points. Twice a day hundreds of LFM balloons The last third of the book is rather disappointing. are released to measure ... " and talking of a fax chart Junger expended a lot of time and energy making the showing the developing storm as ".. . a tightly reader care about the crew of the Andrea Gail, yet he jammed set of barometric lines . . ." His attempts at spent the latter portion of the book describing rescue describing why storms form are rather pathetic, even attempts of other ships' crew, who readers had not to the point of ignoring the Coriolis effect (which is encountered until this point. why they spin counterclockwise). If the meteorologist- In all The Perfect Storm is a suspenseful, quick reader can neglect these oversights, then the book be- read, enjoyable in spite of the grammatical and tech- comes enjoyable. However, there is an important les- nical errors. Junger obviously cared deeply about his son here in that most of what has been learned about subjects and through his words has let the world know cyclogenesis over the past few decades has not been about the lives of men who choose to battle the sea getting out to the public and we face a great challenge for their very existence and how the sea sometimes for the years to come. wins.—Julie Burba and Stu Muench. Suspended somewhere between fact and fiction, Julie Burba is the manager of news and publicity The Perfect Storm is by no means the perfect book. for the AMS. Although it has enjoyed a consistent presence on a Stu Muench is a technical editor for the Journal of number of nonfiction bestseller lists (ranked number the Atmospheric Sciences for the AMS. • 3 on the top 40 amazon.com bestseller list for 1997), Col. Holzman Presented The Robert M. Losey Award, 1947 Established by the Institute of fornia Institute of Technology (1937-1938); and Super- Aeronautical Sciences in 1940, this vising Forecaster, U.S. Weather Bureau, at La Guardia award honors the memory of Capt. Field 1940-42. During the war, Colonel Holzman served Robert Moffatt Losey, a meteorologi- as Senior Forecaster for the U.S. Strategic Air Forces cal officer at the Air Corps, who was and had important responsibilities of a meteorological killed at Dombas, Norway, April 21, nature in connection with the bombing and invasion of 1940, while serving as an official ob- Europe. Shortly after the close of the war, he was as- server for the U.S. Army. He was the signed to handle the meteorological problems connected first officer in the service of the United States to die in with the Bikini atomic bomb experiments. His profes- World War II. For 1947, it was presented at the annual sional and technical accomplishments on this assignment meeting of the Institute on January 1948 to Col. Ben- gained him wide recognition from the Army and Navy jamin G. Holzman, U.S.A.F., "In recognition of out- personnel who were in charge of the experiment. standing contributions to the science of meteorology as In his present position, Colonel Holzman not only has applied to aeronautics." continued to make important contributions himself but also has initiated and guided many important meteoro- Colonel Holzman received his meteorological edu- logical investigations and had an important part in the cation at the California Institute of Technology, which successful formulation of the joint Weather Bureau, awarded him the degree of Master of Science. During Army, Navy, and National Advisory Committee for the period he also was Meteorologist for Eastern Air Aeronautics Thunderstorm Project. Lines (1934-1935); Meteorologist in Charge, American Air Lines (1935-36); Assistant Meteorologist, Soil Con- servation Service (1936-1940); Teaching Fellow, Cali- Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 29,218. 8 75 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 1, 1998

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