50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO about our members Ackerman has long been involved in answering Tom Ackerman has accepted the position of Chief questions relating to heating and cooling of the earth's Scientist for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) atmosphere (climate forcing) and climate change. He Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Pro- is a graduate in physics from Calvin College and re- gram. Ackerman previously served as the site scien- ceived his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Univer- tist for the ARM Tropical Western Pacific Locale and sity of Washington in physics and atmospheric has been a member of the ARM Science Team since 1989. Ackerman will make the transition to his new sciences in 1971 and 1976, respectively. role over the next year, moving to Pacific Northwest After doing postdoctoral research at the Australian National Laboratory from The Pennsylvania State Numerica l Meteorology Research Center in University in the summer of 1999. At Pacific North- Melbourne, Ackerman returned to NASA/Ames Re- west, Ackerman will be named a Battelle Fellow, only search Center in the United States, first as a national the second person to receive such recognition. Battelle research council postdoctoral fellow and later as a per- operates Pacific Northwest for DOE. manent employee. He remained at NASA/Ames until ARM is DOE' s largest contribution to the U.S. Glo- 1988. During this time, he became interested in the bal Change Research Program. It focuses on under- impact of large dust clouds on climate and the ensu- ing nuclear winter discussions; this activity was high- standing the way the sun's energy is transmitted, lighted by the landmark Science journal article by absorbed, and released by the earth's atmosphere; the Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagan in 1983, effect of particles, such as dust, chemicals, and water "Nuclear Winter: Global Consequences of Multiple vapor, on these radiative processes; and the role of Nuclear Explosions." clouds heating and cooling. Data from the ARM pro- gram are used to improve models that predict climate Ackerman joined the faculty of The Pennsylvania change. State University in 1988, becoming a full professor in 1995. At Penn State, he continued work on climate change, focusing on the effects of clouds and aerosols on atmospheric radiative processes and the impacts of cloud and radiative processes on climate and climate change. This focus on cloud-radiative interactions led Editor's Note: The December 1948 Bulletin to his participation in a number of experimental pro- contained reports on a number of Council ac- grams both nationally and internationally, including tions, including the mail ballot of 27 August the ARM program. 1948. That report read as follows: Ackerman has served on notable coordinating and review committees concerned with climate and climate 44, VOTED, to increase the salary change for NASA, NOAA, and the University Corpo- of the Executive Secretary from ration for Atmospheric Research. He has served on $5500 annually to $6500 annu- national and international panels on nuclear winter, the ally effective 1 August 1948, administration's Environmental Task Force, and the with the understanding it is not MEDEA Scientific Consulting Panel. guaranteed to continue if the Ackerman is a member of the AMS and the Ameri- Society's income falls below the can Association for the Advancement of Science. He requirements. has been recognized by the American Physical Soci- ety and NASA with the Leo Szilard award for science Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc29, 553. in the public interest and the H. J. Allen award for an outstanding research paper, respectively. Ackerman 2666 Vol. 79, No. 12, December 1998 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

50 YEARS AGO

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American Meteorological Society
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10.1175/1520-0477-79.12.2822b
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Abstract

about our members Ackerman has long been involved in answering Tom Ackerman has accepted the position of Chief questions relating to heating and cooling of the earth's Scientist for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) atmosphere (climate forcing) and climate change. He Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Pro- is a graduate in physics from Calvin College and re- gram. Ackerman previously served as the site scien- ceived his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Univer- tist for the ARM Tropical Western Pacific Locale and sity of Washington in physics and atmospheric has been a member of the ARM Science Team since 1989. Ackerman will make the transition to his new sciences in 1971 and 1976, respectively. role over the next year, moving to Pacific Northwest After doing postdoctoral research at the Australian National Laboratory from The Pennsylvania State Numerica l Meteorology Research Center in University in the summer of 1999. At Pacific North- Melbourne, Ackerman returned to NASA/Ames Re- west, Ackerman will be named a Battelle Fellow, only search Center in the United States, first as a national the second person to receive such recognition. Battelle research council postdoctoral fellow and later as a per- operates Pacific Northwest for DOE. manent employee. He remained at NASA/Ames until ARM is DOE' s largest contribution to the U.S. Glo- 1988. During this time, he became interested in the bal Change Research Program. It focuses on under- impact of large dust clouds on climate and the ensu- ing nuclear winter discussions; this activity was high- standing the way the sun's energy is transmitted, lighted by the landmark Science journal article by absorbed, and released by the earth's atmosphere; the Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagan in 1983, effect of particles, such as dust, chemicals, and water "Nuclear Winter: Global Consequences of Multiple vapor, on these radiative processes; and the role of Nuclear Explosions." clouds heating and cooling. Data from the ARM pro- gram are used to improve models that predict climate Ackerman joined the faculty of The Pennsylvania change. State University in 1988, becoming a full professor in 1995. At Penn State, he continued work on climate change, focusing on the effects of clouds and aerosols on atmospheric radiative processes and the impacts of cloud and radiative processes on climate and climate change. This focus on cloud-radiative interactions led Editor's Note: The December 1948 Bulletin to his participation in a number of experimental pro- contained reports on a number of Council ac- grams both nationally and internationally, including tions, including the mail ballot of 27 August the ARM program. 1948. That report read as follows: Ackerman has served on notable coordinating and review committees concerned with climate and climate 44, VOTED, to increase the salary change for NASA, NOAA, and the University Corpo- of the Executive Secretary from ration for Atmospheric Research. He has served on $5500 annually to $6500 annu- national and international panels on nuclear winter, the ally effective 1 August 1948, administration's Environmental Task Force, and the with the understanding it is not MEDEA Scientific Consulting Panel. guaranteed to continue if the Ackerman is a member of the AMS and the Ameri- Society's income falls below the can Association for the Advancement of Science. He requirements. has been recognized by the American Physical Soci- ety and NASA with the Leo Szilard award for science Bull Amer. Meteor. Soc29, 553. in the public interest and the H. J. Allen award for an outstanding research paper, respectively. Ackerman 2666 Vol. 79, No. 12, December 1998

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Dec 1, 1998

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