50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO summerlike thunderstorms and lightning swamped the according to industry specialists, who indicate that the aircraft signal, leaving scientists to wonder how typi- future holds a steady increase in air traffic, it makes cal their sampling period was. understanding the effects of air travel on the global Since ozone at 35,000 feet cannot hurt your lungs climate increasingly important. or make your eyes water, why do scientists care about For more information on SONEX, visit the We b site air quality there? According to Thompson, when ozone at http://telsci.arc.nasa.gov/~sonex. gets that high up, it starts to act like a greenhouse gas Spacecraft Provides First Direct Evidence: and can contribute to global warming. Smoke in the Atmosphere Inhibits Rainfall "So knowing how airliners and rockets add to the picture is important for climate research," she said. For the first time, researchers have proven that In the end, Thompson said, the findings showed that smoke from forest fires inhibits rainfall. Their find- jet aircraft, which burn very "clean" fuel, probably ings, published in the 15 October issue of Geophysi- added a few tens of parts per trillion of nitrogen ox- cal Research Letters, are based on an extensive ides to the atmosphere. But the air that far up is so clean analysis of data taken from NASA' s Tropical Rain- that even such a small number of molecules could fall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. mean an increase in nitrogen oxides of more than 20%, The study shows that the "warm rain" processes that Thompson said. often create rain in tropical clouds are practically shut For now, Thompson contends that ozone impacts off when the clouds are polluted with heavy smoke along the Atlantic corridor are too small to detect, but from forest fires. In these clouds, scientists found, the United States Ratifies the Convention of th e Worl d Meteorological Organization The President on May 4, 1949, ratified the Convention of the World Me- teorological Organization opened for signature at Washington on October 11, 1947, and a related protocol concerning Spain opened for signature at the same time. Advice and consent to ratification of the convention and related proto- col was given by the Senate on April 20,1949 . The United States instrument of ratification was deposited on May 4, 1949, in the archives of the Govern- ment, which is designated by the Convention as the depositary government. [ . . . ] Upon its entry into force the Convention will establish the World Meteorological Organization, the basic objective of which is to coordinate, standardize, and improve world meteorological activities and to encourage an efficient exchange of meteoro- logical information between countries in the aid of human activities. [ . . . ] As soon as the World Meteorological Organization comes into being, it will take place as one of the specialized agencies of the United Nations along with aviation, telecom- munications, and postal organizations dealing with problems of transport and communica- tions. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 30, 362-363 2632 Vol. 80 , No. 12,, December 1999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

50 YEARS AGO

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/ams/50-years-ago-qiVp2UcVM5
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-80.12.2756
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

summerlike thunderstorms and lightning swamped the according to industry specialists, who indicate that the aircraft signal, leaving scientists to wonder how typi- future holds a steady increase in air traffic, it makes cal their sampling period was. understanding the effects of air travel on the global Since ozone at 35,000 feet cannot hurt your lungs climate increasingly important. or make your eyes water, why do scientists care about For more information on SONEX, visit the We b site air quality there? According to Thompson, when ozone at http://telsci.arc.nasa.gov/~sonex. gets that high up, it starts to act like a greenhouse gas Spacecraft Provides First Direct Evidence: and can contribute to global warming. Smoke in the Atmosphere Inhibits Rainfall "So knowing how airliners and rockets add to the picture is important for climate research," she said. For the first time, researchers have proven that In the end, Thompson said, the findings showed that smoke from forest fires inhibits rainfall. Their find- jet aircraft, which burn very "clean" fuel, probably ings, published in the 15 October issue of Geophysi- added a few tens of parts per trillion of nitrogen ox- cal Research Letters, are based on an extensive ides to the atmosphere. But the air that far up is so clean analysis of data taken from NASA' s Tropical Rain- that even such a small number of molecules could fall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. mean an increase in nitrogen oxides of more than 20%, The study shows that the "warm rain" processes that Thompson said. often create rain in tropical clouds are practically shut For now, Thompson contends that ozone impacts off when the clouds are polluted with heavy smoke along the Atlantic corridor are too small to detect, but from forest fires. In these clouds, scientists found, the United States Ratifies the Convention of th e Worl d Meteorological Organization The President on May 4, 1949, ratified the Convention of the World Me- teorological Organization opened for signature at Washington on October 11, 1947, and a related protocol concerning Spain opened for signature at the same time. Advice and consent to ratification of the convention and related proto- col was given by the Senate on April 20,1949 . The United States instrument of ratification was deposited on May 4, 1949, in the archives of the Govern- ment, which is designated by the Convention as the depositary government. [ . . . ] Upon its entry into force the Convention will establish the World Meteorological Organization, the basic objective of which is to coordinate, standardize, and improve world meteorological activities and to encourage an efficient exchange of meteoro- logical information between countries in the aid of human activities. [ . . . ] As soon as the World Meteorological Organization comes into being, it will take place as one of the specialized agencies of the United Nations along with aviation, telecom- munications, and postal organizations dealing with problems of transport and communica- tions. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 30, 362-363 2632 Vol. 80 , No. 12,, December 1999

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Dec 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial