50 Years Ago

50 Years Ago makers, and 4) maximizing the use of technology. He Society's public information program. One example began by outlining new features in the realm of AMS was the preparation of a transition document on natu- publications, beginning with the news of a new AMS ral hazards for the new presidential administration. Bulletin. News with other publications includes nine McPherson encouraged all AMS members to write current journals, one that is published only online. The their respective senators and representatives to urge other eight are also available online. One area of im- them to support increased investment in the physical provement the AMS is striving for is shortening the sciences, budgets for the federal agencies with atmo- journal production time, reducing the time from when spheric programs (NOAA, NASA, DOE, DOD, EPA), the manuscript is received in final form until publica- and the U.S. Weather Research Program. Finally, tion to 150 days from the current average of 210 days. McPherson outlined areas where he felt the Society Other current activities at the AMS involved a new needs to improve its efforts: attracting the brightest public information officer and expansion of the students, reaching more science teachers, promoting science literacy, exposing students to policy issues, promoting the profession, and preserving the history of the science. Next, John White introduced the newly elected of- Announcing the "Compendium of ficer s for 2001-02: Chapter Chairman Frank Meteorology," edited by Schiermeier, Chapter Vice-Chair Emily Byrd, Chap- Thomas F. Malone ter Secretary Michael Brennan, and Chapter Treasurer Shaun Baines. Finally, to close the evening, Schiermeier asked Published by the AMS, this large work has each member to help increase chapter membership by been made possible through support and spon- encouraging a friend or colleague to joi n next year.— sorship extended by the Geophysics Research Michael Brennan Division of the Air Force Cambridge Research Center. Greater Miami Preparation of three years has The last meeting before the beginning of the hurri- been involved in the writing, cane season was held on 30 May at the Tropical Pre- editing, and publication arrange- diction Center/National Hurricane Center in Miami. ments for the Compendium of The newly elected Chapter President, Jason Dunion, Meteorology. This is easily un- called the meeting to order. After chapter business was derstood when one views the discussed, V. Mohan Karyampudi from NOAA/NCEP scope of the book, 102 interna- was introduced as the guest speaker. His talk was titled tionally represented authors, "Influence of the Saharan Air Layer on Tropical Cy- 108 articles on topics of weather from pole to clogenesis over the North Atlantic." equator, from microseisms to the ionosphere. In the presentation, Karyampudi said that although The purpose of the Compendium is to summa- it is well known that African waves are the seedlings rize and appraise what is known of meteorology for a majority of tropical storms that form over the and to point the way toward further progress. North Atlantic, tropical cyclogenesis in this region Meteorologists and atmospheric physicists have remains an enigma. In order to address this issue, combined their efforts in fulfilling this purpose. Karyampudi and Pierce (WHO IS PIERCE7-ASK f.. . ] Never before has such an extraordinary KELLY) have recently conducted a detailed study us- task been undertaken in the history of meteorol- ing four cases that consecutively occurred during the ogy. This work, which we believe will attain the 1992-95 hurricane seasons. Based on these results, position of a classic, reveals clearly at mid-cen- they suggested that tropical cyclogenesis over the east- tury the challenge which faces those most con- ern Atlantic is largely influenced by the Saharan Air cerned with the atmosphere and its phenomena. Layer (SAL), which is frequently transported by the Africa n waves across the Atlantic (Carlson and Prospero 1972). In particular, they have shown that the Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 32, 294. sign reversal of the meridional gradient of potential vorticity (PV) exists across the mid-tropospheric jet 2180 Vol. 82,, No. 10, October 2001 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

50 Years Ago

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Abstract

makers, and 4) maximizing the use of technology. He Society's public information program. One example began by outlining new features in the realm of AMS was the preparation of a transition document on natu- publications, beginning with the news of a new AMS ral hazards for the new presidential administration. Bulletin. News with other publications includes nine McPherson encouraged all AMS members to write current journals, one that is published only online. The their respective senators and representatives to urge other eight are also available online. One area of im- them to support increased investment in the physical provement the AMS is striving for is shortening the sciences, budgets for the federal agencies with atmo- journal production time, reducing the time from when spheric programs (NOAA, NASA, DOE, DOD, EPA), the manuscript is received in final form until publica- and the U.S. Weather Research Program. Finally, tion to 150 days from the current average of 210 days. McPherson outlined areas where he felt the Society Other current activities at the AMS involved a new needs to improve its efforts: attracting the brightest public information officer and expansion of the students, reaching more science teachers, promoting science literacy, exposing students to policy issues, promoting the profession, and preserving the history of the science. Next, John White introduced the newly elected of- Announcing the "Compendium of ficer s for 2001-02: Chapter Chairman Frank Meteorology," edited by Schiermeier, Chapter Vice-Chair Emily Byrd, Chap- Thomas F. Malone ter Secretary Michael Brennan, and Chapter Treasurer Shaun Baines. Finally, to close the evening, Schiermeier asked Published by the AMS, this large work has each member to help increase chapter membership by been made possible through support and spon- encouraging a friend or colleague to joi n next year.— sorship extended by the Geophysics Research Michael Brennan Division of the Air Force Cambridge Research Center. Greater Miami Preparation of three years has The last meeting before the beginning of the hurri- been involved in the writing, cane season was held on 30 May at the Tropical Pre- editing, and publication arrange- diction Center/National Hurricane Center in Miami. ments for the Compendium of The newly elected Chapter President, Jason Dunion, Meteorology. This is easily un- called the meeting to order. After chapter business was derstood when one views the discussed, V. Mohan Karyampudi from NOAA/NCEP scope of the book, 102 interna- was introduced as the guest speaker. His talk was titled tionally represented authors, "Influence of the Saharan Air Layer on Tropical Cy- 108 articles on topics of weather from pole to clogenesis over the North Atlantic." equator, from microseisms to the ionosphere. In the presentation, Karyampudi said that although The purpose of the Compendium is to summa- it is well known that African waves are the seedlings rize and appraise what is known of meteorology for a majority of tropical storms that form over the and to point the way toward further progress. North Atlantic, tropical cyclogenesis in this region Meteorologists and atmospheric physicists have remains an enigma. In order to address this issue, combined their efforts in fulfilling this purpose. Karyampudi and Pierce (WHO IS PIERCE7-ASK f.. . ] Never before has such an extraordinary KELLY) have recently conducted a detailed study us- task been undertaken in the history of meteorol- ing four cases that consecutively occurred during the ogy. This work, which we believe will attain the 1992-95 hurricane seasons. Based on these results, position of a classic, reveals clearly at mid-cen- they suggested that tropical cyclogenesis over the east- tury the challenge which faces those most con- ern Atlantic is largely influenced by the Saharan Air cerned with the atmosphere and its phenomena. Layer (SAL), which is frequently transported by the Africa n waves across the Atlantic (Carlson and Prospero 1972). In particular, they have shown that the Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 32, 294. sign reversal of the meridional gradient of potential vorticity (PV) exists across the mid-tropospheric jet 2180 Vol. 82,, No. 10, October 2001

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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