50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO Editor s note: The June 1945 Bulletin, as part of the 25th are ago anniversary celebration, carried brief biographies of each of the Society's presidents over the years. Reprinted here is the biography of the first of the presidents, Robert DeCourcy Ward. It should be noted that his son, an investment banker; later served the Society as treasurer for many years. Robert DeCourcy Ward and some other countries, including China, whence Robert DeCourcy Ward wa s America's greatteacher his foreign students had come; but also the U.S. of climatology. He entered the subject from the hu- Weather Bureau through the influence of his books manistic approach, his prior interests having been and his graduates. His teaching was extraordinarily literary rather than scientific. William Morris Davis had well organized and clear cut. intrigued him with meteorology, which War d continued Professor Ward's profound common sense was a to teach 1 to literally thou- boon to the thousands whom he advised: not only the sands of undergradu- students in his courses and his numerous correspon- ates while he developed dents, but also generations of Harvard freshmen, for a research as well as a he was chairman of the Board of Freshman Advisers teaching interest in the for several years. His contribution as a citizen of the special phase, climatol- United States was virtually the education of the coun- ogy. The influence of try, fro m 1893 to 1930, as to the necessity for restricted climate on man was his immigration and then the writing of the present immi- chief interest;2 but it was gration law. founded on thorough Professor Ward died at 64 in 1931 —C. F. Brooks. study of the principles of climatology3 and re- Practica l exercises in elementary meteorology, Boston, 1899. gional climatology. His 2Climate, considered especially in relation to man, New York, 1908, courses covered the cli- 3Handboo k of climatology, New York, 1903 (Transl. and amplif. of mates of the earth, de- Hann.). scriptive and interpre- 4The climates of the United States, Boston, 1925. tative; but he and his 5Climatology of the West Indies (jt. auth.), Berlin, 1934. students went back to basic data to unfold the charac- 6The climates of North America (jt. auth.), Berlin, 1936. teristics of the climates of the United States,4 and, later, of the West Indies5 and North America.6 His work as a climatologist permeated not only the teaching of climatology in all parts of the United States Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 26, 235. • About Our Members Ntite • Chapter News • Announcements The Bulletin relies on its readership for timely infor- • Continuing Education mation on members' accomplishments, chapter hap- penings, and professional developments, conferences, Submit information to and publications. Consider whether you could con- Bulletin News Editor, Bulletin of the American tribute to the following features appearing in the Meteorological Society, 45 Beacon Street, Boston, Bulletin. MA 02108-3693; fax (617) 742-8718 988 Vol. 76, No. 6, June 1995 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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10.1175/1520-0477-76.6.988
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Abstract

Editor s note: The June 1945 Bulletin, as part of the 25th are ago anniversary celebration, carried brief biographies of each of the Society's presidents over the years. Reprinted here is the biography of the first of the presidents, Robert DeCourcy Ward. It should be noted that his son, an investment banker; later served the Society as treasurer for many years. Robert DeCourcy Ward and some other countries, including China, whence Robert DeCourcy Ward wa s America's greatteacher his foreign students had come; but also the U.S. of climatology. He entered the subject from the hu- Weather Bureau through the influence of his books manistic approach, his prior interests having been and his graduates. His teaching was extraordinarily literary rather than scientific. William Morris Davis had well organized and clear cut. intrigued him with meteorology, which War d continued Professor Ward's profound common sense was a to teach 1 to literally thou- boon to the thousands whom he advised: not only the sands of undergradu- students in his courses and his numerous correspon- ates while he developed dents, but also generations of Harvard freshmen, for a research as well as a he was chairman of the Board of Freshman Advisers teaching interest in the for several years. His contribution as a citizen of the special phase, climatol- United States was virtually the education of the coun- ogy. The influence of try, fro m 1893 to 1930, as to the necessity for restricted climate on man was his immigration and then the writing of the present immi- chief interest;2 but it was gration law. founded on thorough Professor Ward died at 64 in 1931 —C. F. Brooks. study of the principles of climatology3 and re- Practica l exercises in elementary meteorology, Boston, 1899. gional climatology. His 2Climate, considered especially in relation to man, New York, 1908, courses covered the cli- 3Handboo k of climatology, New York, 1903 (Transl. and amplif. of mates of the earth, de- Hann.). scriptive and interpre- 4The climates of the United States, Boston, 1925. tative; but he and his 5Climatology of the West Indies (jt. auth.), Berlin, 1934. students went back to basic data to unfold the charac- 6The climates of North America (jt. auth.), Berlin, 1936. teristics of the climates of the United States,4 and, later, of the West Indies5 and North America.6 His work as a climatologist permeated not only the teaching of climatology in all parts of the United States Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 26, 235. • About Our Members Ntite • Chapter News • Announcements The Bulletin relies on its readership for timely infor- • Continuing Education mation on members' accomplishments, chapter hap- penings, and professional developments, conferences, Submit information to and publications. Consider whether you could con- Bulletin News Editor, Bulletin of the American tribute to the following features appearing in the Meteorological Society, 45 Beacon Street, Boston, Bulletin. MA 02108-3693; fax (617) 742-8718 988 Vol. 76, No. 6, June 1995

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 1, 1995

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