50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO Technological Cooperation. The EWG was initiated The atlas was constructed by a team of Russian and under the U.S.-Russian Bi-national Commission on American scientists working together. Contributors to Economic and Technological Cooperation as part of the atlas include the U.S. National Ice Center (a unique a strong commitment in Russia and the United States interagency supported by the U.S. Navy, NOAA, and to find ways of combining the separate scientific the U.S. Coast Guard), the U.S. Navy Arctic Subma- strengths and environmental data resources that had rine Laboratory, the University of Washington, which been previously restricted. is the lead organization for archiving the International During the development of this atlas, the EWG was Arctic Buoy Program, and the Arctic and Antarctic chaired by D. James Baker, NOAA administrator, and Research Institute in St. Petersburg. The sea ice atlas V.I. Danilov-Danilyan, former chairman, State Com- is based on individual observations collected over the mittee of the Russian Federation for Environmental period 1950-94 from U.S. and Russian satellite data, Protection. Vice Adm. Paul Gaffney made significant ice stations, icebreakers, and airborne ice surveys. Additionally, the U.S. Navy provided a very impor- contributions to the EWG project while serving as the tant contribution by declassifying submarine upward commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography looking sonar data specifically for this project. U.S. Command and the chief of Naval Research. Gaffney submarines operating in the Arctic over the period is currently the president of the National Defense from 1977 to 1993 collected the historical ULS data University. as well as previously classified ice climatology. The atlas is available from the National Snow and Ice Data Center, Campus Box 449, University of Colo- rado, Boulder, CO 80309. NSIDC also distributes other volumes in the series. For a complete descrip- tion of the atlases, visit the Web site at http://nsidc.org/ ewg or contact the NSIDC User Services Office at nsidc @ kry o s .Colorado. edu. Of the 23 accidents tak- Environmental Health Risk 2001 to be Held ing 25 or more lives in in Wales 1948-50, 7 were due di- The First International Conference on the Impact rectly to storm or flood. of Environmental Factors on Health will be held 10- The great wind and snow- 12 September 2001 in Cardiff, Wales, United King- storm of Nov. 25, 1950, dom. The conference is organized by the Wessex killed an estimated 100, the Institute of Technology. greatest of any disaster in Environmental Health Risk 2001 will provide a the 3 years. Tornadoes in Arkansas and forum for the dissemination and exchange of informa- Louisiana on Jan. 3, 1949, took 59 lives, tion on the impacts of environmental factors on health, and in Louisiana and Texas, Feb. 11-12, which often require a complex approach to effectively 1950, and Illinois Mar. 19,1949,38 and 36, recognize and avoid the main risks. The conference respectively. Floods in Oregon and Wash- will be of particular interest to health specialists in ington, in May-June, 1948, claimed about government and industry as well as researchers in- 50 lives, and flash floods in West Virginia, volved within the broad area of environmental health June 25, 1950, 31. The Mountain States risk. blizzard of Jan. 2-4 , 1949, killed about 25 For further information contact the conference sec- persons.—C.F.B. (from information in Sta- retariat at EHRISK 2001, Wessex Institute of Tech- tistical Bulletin, Metropolitan Life Insur- nology, Ashurst Lodge, Ashurst, Southampton, S040 ance Co., v. 31, p. 7, Dec. 1950). 7AA; telephone: 44 (0) 238 029 3223; fax: 44 (0) 238 029 2853; e-mail: shanley@wessex.ac.uk. More infor- mation, including the call for papers, can be found on I Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 32, 31. the Web site at http://www.wessex.ac.uk/conferences/ 2001/envh01. • • mmmmm m 154 Vol. 82, No. 1, January 2001 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

Technological Cooperation. The EWG was initiated The atlas was constructed by a team of Russian and under the U.S.-Russian Bi-national Commission on American scientists working together. Contributors to Economic and Technological Cooperation as part of the atlas include the U.S. National Ice Center (a unique a strong commitment in Russia and the United States interagency supported by the U.S. Navy, NOAA, and to find ways of combining the separate scientific the U.S. Coast Guard), the U.S. Navy Arctic Subma- strengths and environmental data resources that had rine Laboratory, the University of Washington, which been previously restricted. is the lead organization for archiving the International During the development of this atlas, the EWG was Arctic Buoy Program, and the Arctic and Antarctic chaired by D. James Baker, NOAA administrator, and Research Institute in St. Petersburg. The sea ice atlas V.I. Danilov-Danilyan, former chairman, State Com- is based on individual observations collected over the mittee of the Russian Federation for Environmental period 1950-94 from U.S. and Russian satellite data, Protection. Vice Adm. Paul Gaffney made significant ice stations, icebreakers, and airborne ice surveys. Additionally, the U.S. Navy provided a very impor- contributions to the EWG project while serving as the tant contribution by declassifying submarine upward commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography looking sonar data specifically for this project. U.S. Command and the chief of Naval Research. Gaffney submarines operating in the Arctic over the period is currently the president of the National Defense from 1977 to 1993 collected the historical ULS data University. as well as previously classified ice climatology. The atlas is available from the National Snow and Ice Data Center, Campus Box 449, University of Colo- rado, Boulder, CO 80309. NSIDC also distributes other volumes in the series. For a complete descrip- tion of the atlases, visit the Web site at http://nsidc.org/ ewg or contact the NSIDC User Services Office at nsidc @ kry o s .Colorado. edu. Of the 23 accidents tak- Environmental Health Risk 2001 to be Held ing 25 or more lives in in Wales 1948-50, 7 were due di- The First International Conference on the Impact rectly to storm or flood. of Environmental Factors on Health will be held 10- The great wind and snow- 12 September 2001 in Cardiff, Wales, United King- storm of Nov. 25, 1950, dom. The conference is organized by the Wessex killed an estimated 100, the Institute of Technology. greatest of any disaster in Environmental Health Risk 2001 will provide a the 3 years. Tornadoes in Arkansas and forum for the dissemination and exchange of informa- Louisiana on Jan. 3, 1949, took 59 lives, tion on the impacts of environmental factors on health, and in Louisiana and Texas, Feb. 11-12, which often require a complex approach to effectively 1950, and Illinois Mar. 19,1949,38 and 36, recognize and avoid the main risks. The conference respectively. Floods in Oregon and Wash- will be of particular interest to health specialists in ington, in May-June, 1948, claimed about government and industry as well as researchers in- 50 lives, and flash floods in West Virginia, volved within the broad area of environmental health June 25, 1950, 31. The Mountain States risk. blizzard of Jan. 2-4 , 1949, killed about 25 For further information contact the conference sec- persons.—C.F.B. (from information in Sta- retariat at EHRISK 2001, Wessex Institute of Tech- tistical Bulletin, Metropolitan Life Insur- nology, Ashurst Lodge, Ashurst, Southampton, S040 ance Co., v. 31, p. 7, Dec. 1950). 7AA; telephone: 44 (0) 238 029 3223; fax: 44 (0) 238 029 2853; e-mail: shanley@wessex.ac.uk. More infor- mation, including the call for papers, can be found on I Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 32, 31. the Web site at http://www.wessex.ac.uk/conferences/ 2001/envh01. • • mmmmm m 154 Vol. 82, No. 1, January 2001

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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