50 Years Ago

50 Years Ago tures and the affect of such a harsh climate on the people working there. £XtZoi* Note ^ Zeller's presentation concluded when Fields pre- sented Zeller with a Midland NOAA Weather Radio Submit chapter meeting contributions to Bulletin as a thank you for his presentation.—Pat Cooper. News Editor, AMS, 45 Beacon St., Boston, MA 02108-3693; fax 617-742-8718; e-mail: jburba@ ametsoc.org. Opportunities for Oceanographer-Meteorologists The Executive Secretary's office of the Society has received the following letter from the Hydrographic Office of the Navy Dept.— 12 February 1946 Dear Professor Rossby:— I have been told by Professor H. U. Sverdrup and Commander Roger Revell of the service you are rendering meteorologists now being discharged from the Army and Navy in keeping them informed of further courses of instruction and of possible employment in which their military training and experience may be utilized. In this connection, I recently received a prospectus of a post-war instruction program in oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of Cali- fornia. While I understand that you have already announced this new program and given an estimate of prob- able openings for 20 to 25 oceanographers in civil service and at various oceanographic institutions, I believe it is timely to send you details concerning the expansion of the oceanographic work at the Hydrographic Of- fice, which has just been approved by the Secretary of the Navy. I have established a Division of Oceanogra- phy to be responsible for this new program. It is expected that within the next few years we will have at least sixteen professional oceanographers. Some of these positions now available can be filled by men who were trained prior to 1941 or whom have received sufficient training in this sort of work during the war. Within the next few years, however, it appears that there will be a serious shortage of trained oceanographic person- nel for positions in the Hydrographic Office. In addition, plans of various Navy laboratories and bureaus in- clude extensive oceanographic research. By a conservative estimate, therefore, it seems likely that there will be need for 10 to 15 more oceanogra- phers in the Hydrographic Office and other naval bureaus and laboratories within the next two or three years. In the Hydrographic Office it is to be anticipated that initial openings will be chiefly in Civil Service P-2 and P-3 ratings with starting salaries ranging from $2980 to $3640, although several higher grades should also be available. In addition, the Hydrographic Office will sponsor a number of projects to be carried on at oceanographic institutions and this work will require an increase in the number of oceanographers employed at these institu- tions. I therefore hazard the guess that with the renewed impetus given to oceanography during the war, there will be an even greater number of vacancies (perhaps 30 or more oceanographers) in oceanographic institu- tions, universities and other governmental agencies. If it seems appropriate, I think it highly desirable to call the attention of the Army and Navy meteorolo- gists to the probability of finding suitable employment on completion of the new course in oceanography to be given at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Sincerely yours, G.S . BRYAN, Rear Admiral, U.S.N. (Ret.), Hydrographer Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 27, 92-93. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 38 3 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/ams/50-years-ago-mn0GI7fqXW
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-77.2.383
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

tures and the affect of such a harsh climate on the people working there. £XtZoi* Note ^ Zeller's presentation concluded when Fields pre- sented Zeller with a Midland NOAA Weather Radio Submit chapter meeting contributions to Bulletin as a thank you for his presentation.—Pat Cooper. News Editor, AMS, 45 Beacon St., Boston, MA 02108-3693; fax 617-742-8718; e-mail: jburba@ ametsoc.org. Opportunities for Oceanographer-Meteorologists The Executive Secretary's office of the Society has received the following letter from the Hydrographic Office of the Navy Dept.— 12 February 1946 Dear Professor Rossby:— I have been told by Professor H. U. Sverdrup and Commander Roger Revell of the service you are rendering meteorologists now being discharged from the Army and Navy in keeping them informed of further courses of instruction and of possible employment in which their military training and experience may be utilized. In this connection, I recently received a prospectus of a post-war instruction program in oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of Cali- fornia. While I understand that you have already announced this new program and given an estimate of prob- able openings for 20 to 25 oceanographers in civil service and at various oceanographic institutions, I believe it is timely to send you details concerning the expansion of the oceanographic work at the Hydrographic Of- fice, which has just been approved by the Secretary of the Navy. I have established a Division of Oceanogra- phy to be responsible for this new program. It is expected that within the next few years we will have at least sixteen professional oceanographers. Some of these positions now available can be filled by men who were trained prior to 1941 or whom have received sufficient training in this sort of work during the war. Within the next few years, however, it appears that there will be a serious shortage of trained oceanographic person- nel for positions in the Hydrographic Office. In addition, plans of various Navy laboratories and bureaus in- clude extensive oceanographic research. By a conservative estimate, therefore, it seems likely that there will be need for 10 to 15 more oceanogra- phers in the Hydrographic Office and other naval bureaus and laboratories within the next two or three years. In the Hydrographic Office it is to be anticipated that initial openings will be chiefly in Civil Service P-2 and P-3 ratings with starting salaries ranging from $2980 to $3640, although several higher grades should also be available. In addition, the Hydrographic Office will sponsor a number of projects to be carried on at oceanographic institutions and this work will require an increase in the number of oceanographers employed at these institu- tions. I therefore hazard the guess that with the renewed impetus given to oceanography during the war, there will be an even greater number of vacancies (perhaps 30 or more oceanographers) in oceanographic institu- tions, universities and other governmental agencies. If it seems appropriate, I think it highly desirable to call the attention of the Army and Navy meteorolo- gists to the probability of finding suitable employment on completion of the new course in oceanography to be given at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Sincerely yours, G.S . BRYAN, Rear Admiral, U.S.N. (Ret.), Hydrographer Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 27, 92-93. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 38 3

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Feb 1, 1996

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial