50 years ago

50 years ago clouds. Comparison with a sleet event suggested it best, especially when dealing with the opposing law- may be possible to develo p an index to aid in forecast- yers wh o will try t o intimidate witnesses . He suggested ing freezing rain and sleet events.—Lauraleen not bringing a lot of notes about the case into the O'Connor. courtroo m because any notes that are brought in can be subpoenaed by the opposition. Kansas City Whilediscussinghisvariouscases , Pearson showed Twenty-fiv e members convened on 20 January slides with some of the information he used in the 1994 at Jennie' s Italian Restaurant in downtow n Kan- court. Th e data included analyzed maps, graphs, and sas City. Chapte r President Dan McCarthy introduced satellite and radar pictures. He also discussed some the evening's guest speaker, Allen Pearson, a retired of the rates that meteorologists charge for their con- NW S employee. Pearson retired from federal service sulting services . Atth e en d of his presentation, Pearson in 1981. He has served as meteorologist in charg e of answere d several questions from the audience about the Kansas City Weather Bureau and director of the other cases. One final point he made about the work Central Region NWS . He currentl y work s as a consult- wa s how it can be frustrating because of unexpected ing meteorologist specializing in lawsuits involving postponement s that can cause lengthy delays. fatal airplane accidents wher e weather was a contrib- At the conclusio n of the presentation, Pearson was uting factor. His presentation covered some of his presente d with a weathe r radio as a thank-yo u gift for experience s in the capacity of consulting meteorolo- being the guest speaker. McCarthy said a farewell to gist. membe r Alan Cope, who accepted the SO O position Pearson gave a brief sketch of how he began as a at the new Philadelphia weather service office. consulting meteorologist. He noted that a person's McCarth y also introduced Robyn Weeks , who serves resume is very important to give credibility to one's as president of the Kansas University student chap- expertise. To start in the business, he first tried ter.—Pa t Cooper. advertising, but soon learned that word of mouth was the best method for lining up new clients. West Texas Pearson discussed several airplane crash case s in Th e spring semester at Texa s Tech got under way whic h he served as an expert witness for the federal rather quickly, with four students attending the AMS government . He brought up several points that he has 74th Annual Meeting in Nashville, Tennessee. learned over the years, one of whic h wa s not to make A seminar given by Jame s R. McDonald, a profes- the presentation too elaborate. sor in the Civil Engineering Department, was the first In addition to keeping the presentation simple, activity of the semester, held on 25 February 1994. Pearson also made the point that keeping to short Th e topic of McDonald' s discussion wa s Texa s Tech's answer s and not trying to explain everything works involvement in the spring VORTEX experiment. The Congratulations to Prof. Morandi from the American Meteorological Society A s secretary of the American Meteorological Society I wish to compliment Professor Morandi and his associates of the Junta Nacional de Meteorologia de Uruguay on their fine work in organizing and publishing their Revista Meteorologica. The y clearly sa w th e need an d had th e courag e an d determinatio n to carry through this important project. Already they have published a considerable number of noteworthy South American contributions to meteorology, and w e wish the m continued success in th e future. The Revista should be better known outside of South America, and we are glad to cooperate to this end. Reader s of th eBulleti n hav e alread y see n th e Revista announced in the Bibliography and are able to obtain it through the Book Service. I believe that this new publication from South America with its already sizable list of contributions from South American meteorologists indicates a notable step forward for meteorolog y in our hemisphere.—Charles F. Brooks, Secretary. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 25,136. 65 6 Vol. 75, No. 4, April 1994 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

clouds. Comparison with a sleet event suggested it best, especially when dealing with the opposing law- may be possible to develo p an index to aid in forecast- yers wh o will try t o intimidate witnesses . He suggested ing freezing rain and sleet events.—Lauraleen not bringing a lot of notes about the case into the O'Connor. courtroo m because any notes that are brought in can be subpoenaed by the opposition. Kansas City Whilediscussinghisvariouscases , Pearson showed Twenty-fiv e members convened on 20 January slides with some of the information he used in the 1994 at Jennie' s Italian Restaurant in downtow n Kan- court. Th e data included analyzed maps, graphs, and sas City. Chapte r President Dan McCarthy introduced satellite and radar pictures. He also discussed some the evening's guest speaker, Allen Pearson, a retired of the rates that meteorologists charge for their con- NW S employee. Pearson retired from federal service sulting services . Atth e en d of his presentation, Pearson in 1981. He has served as meteorologist in charg e of answere d several questions from the audience about the Kansas City Weather Bureau and director of the other cases. One final point he made about the work Central Region NWS . He currentl y work s as a consult- wa s how it can be frustrating because of unexpected ing meteorologist specializing in lawsuits involving postponement s that can cause lengthy delays. fatal airplane accidents wher e weather was a contrib- At the conclusio n of the presentation, Pearson was uting factor. His presentation covered some of his presente d with a weathe r radio as a thank-yo u gift for experience s in the capacity of consulting meteorolo- being the guest speaker. McCarthy said a farewell to gist. membe r Alan Cope, who accepted the SO O position Pearson gave a brief sketch of how he began as a at the new Philadelphia weather service office. consulting meteorologist. He noted that a person's McCarth y also introduced Robyn Weeks , who serves resume is very important to give credibility to one's as president of the Kansas University student chap- expertise. To start in the business, he first tried ter.—Pa t Cooper. advertising, but soon learned that word of mouth was the best method for lining up new clients. West Texas Pearson discussed several airplane crash case s in Th e spring semester at Texa s Tech got under way whic h he served as an expert witness for the federal rather quickly, with four students attending the AMS government . He brought up several points that he has 74th Annual Meeting in Nashville, Tennessee. learned over the years, one of whic h wa s not to make A seminar given by Jame s R. McDonald, a profes- the presentation too elaborate. sor in the Civil Engineering Department, was the first In addition to keeping the presentation simple, activity of the semester, held on 25 February 1994. Pearson also made the point that keeping to short Th e topic of McDonald' s discussion wa s Texa s Tech's answer s and not trying to explain everything works involvement in the spring VORTEX experiment. The Congratulations to Prof. Morandi from the American Meteorological Society A s secretary of the American Meteorological Society I wish to compliment Professor Morandi and his associates of the Junta Nacional de Meteorologia de Uruguay on their fine work in organizing and publishing their Revista Meteorologica. The y clearly sa w th e need an d had th e courag e an d determinatio n to carry through this important project. Already they have published a considerable number of noteworthy South American contributions to meteorology, and w e wish the m continued success in th e future. The Revista should be better known outside of South America, and we are glad to cooperate to this end. Reader s of th eBulleti n hav e alread y see n th e Revista announced in the Bibliography and are able to obtain it through the Book Service. I believe that this new publication from South America with its already sizable list of contributions from South American meteorologists indicates a notable step forward for meteorolog y in our hemisphere.—Charles F. Brooks, Secretary. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 25,136. 65 6 Vol. 75, No. 4, April 1994

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 1, 1994

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