50 years ago

50 years ago confirmation from the AMS that the Severe Local and improved mesoscale models will be needed. Storms and Atmospheric Electricity conferences will MacDonald explained that FSL is acquiring a mas- be held in St. Louis on 4- 8 October 1993 at the Clarion sively parallel computer and working on mesoscale Hotel. Col. George Frederick, commander of Air models. MacDonald offered the opinion that these Weather Service, introduced the guest speaker, new tools will result in improved 1 - to 24-hour forecasts Alexander MacDonald, from NOAA's Forecast Sys- during the next decade. tem Laboratory (FSL). MacDonald stated that FSL's mission is to transfer Denver-Boulde r the latest advances in science and technology to Marcia Politovich of NCAR's Research Applica- operations with emphasis on the 0- to 1 -hour warning/ tions Program presented the program at the Decem- nowcast and the 1 - to 24-hour prediction. MacDonald ber meeting. Her topic, "Icing, Aircraft, and Accidents," showed data from the 19 July 1991 Denver hailstorm focused on aircraft icing and recent developments in that caused more than 700 million dollars' worth of forecasting icing in winter storms as part of the FAA damage. MacDonald said that Doppler radar showed Icing Forecasting Improvement Program. According numerous symmetric bounded weak-echo regions in to Politovich, aircraft icing occurs in flight during en- the midtroposphere. He said that the FSL-built DARE counters with supercooled liquid water (SLW) and on workstation was in use at the time and helped the the ground during snowfall events. She said that icing Denver NWSFO issue timely warnings. According to accidents account for about 40 fatalities per year. MacDonald, the modernization of the National Weather Politovich showed examples of icing effects on airfoils, Service will make these capabilities nationwide. then presented a case study that demonstrated the spatial and temporal variability of SLW in a winter MacDonald said that improvements to 1 - to 24-hour storm over the Denver area. She explained that icing predictions will be more difficult. He explained that was presumably the cause of an aircraft accident increases in observations (Doppler radar, Automated during this storm event. Politovich discussed ground Surface Observing System, profilers) will increase the deicing problems during intense snowfall or flight quantitative specification of the atmosphere by a fac- delays, or both. Snow forecasting on the short term is tor of 30 between the years 1985 and 1995. To still in its infancy, Politovich said, relying mainly on improve forecasts, MacDonald said, faster computers Report of the Committee on Professional Standards and Practices in Meteorology for 1942 Two cases have been considered by the committee during 1942. This report has to do with the general principles involved. The names of the people involved will be furnished to anyone who should have the information. The first case was that of a youn g meteorologist who was writing a book on weather for pilots. He is a member of the American Meteorological Society and wished to use that fact in the preface of the book and probably later for advertising purposes. This did not seem a wise practice. A good author and a good book do not need to mention membership. In the case of others it must be remembered that membership is very easy to gain. It involves nothing but interest and some connection with meteorology. To play up prominently membership might give the misleading impression that the American Meteorological Society was sponsoring or endorsing what he had written. The second case wa s that of a popularly known person who gave a course on meteorology under educational or academic auspices. In the first place promises were held out to those taking the course that certain positions in the Army or Navy or the Weather Bureau could be obtained by taking this course with no other qualifications. These false promises were later retracted and that part of the situation was rectified. This person also makes long range weather predictions for a year or more ahead for private gain and by methods which are not published or are known to be useless. This committee most decidedly takes the stand that no academic or educational institution should employ a person as meteorological instructor who lacks proved knowledge in the fundamentals of the science or who turns the public need for long range weather forecasts to private profit by selling predictions based upon methods kept secret from the profession or known to be useless.—Willis I. Milham, Chairman, D. M. Little, J. J. George. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 24, 73-74. 262 Vol. 74,, No. 2, February 1993 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

confirmation from the AMS that the Severe Local and improved mesoscale models will be needed. Storms and Atmospheric Electricity conferences will MacDonald explained that FSL is acquiring a mas- be held in St. Louis on 4- 8 October 1993 at the Clarion sively parallel computer and working on mesoscale Hotel. Col. George Frederick, commander of Air models. MacDonald offered the opinion that these Weather Service, introduced the guest speaker, new tools will result in improved 1 - to 24-hour forecasts Alexander MacDonald, from NOAA's Forecast Sys- during the next decade. tem Laboratory (FSL). MacDonald stated that FSL's mission is to transfer Denver-Boulde r the latest advances in science and technology to Marcia Politovich of NCAR's Research Applica- operations with emphasis on the 0- to 1 -hour warning/ tions Program presented the program at the Decem- nowcast and the 1 - to 24-hour prediction. MacDonald ber meeting. Her topic, "Icing, Aircraft, and Accidents," showed data from the 19 July 1991 Denver hailstorm focused on aircraft icing and recent developments in that caused more than 700 million dollars' worth of forecasting icing in winter storms as part of the FAA damage. MacDonald said that Doppler radar showed Icing Forecasting Improvement Program. According numerous symmetric bounded weak-echo regions in to Politovich, aircraft icing occurs in flight during en- the midtroposphere. He said that the FSL-built DARE counters with supercooled liquid water (SLW) and on workstation was in use at the time and helped the the ground during snowfall events. She said that icing Denver NWSFO issue timely warnings. According to accidents account for about 40 fatalities per year. MacDonald, the modernization of the National Weather Politovich showed examples of icing effects on airfoils, Service will make these capabilities nationwide. then presented a case study that demonstrated the spatial and temporal variability of SLW in a winter MacDonald said that improvements to 1 - to 24-hour storm over the Denver area. She explained that icing predictions will be more difficult. He explained that was presumably the cause of an aircraft accident increases in observations (Doppler radar, Automated during this storm event. Politovich discussed ground Surface Observing System, profilers) will increase the deicing problems during intense snowfall or flight quantitative specification of the atmosphere by a fac- delays, or both. Snow forecasting on the short term is tor of 30 between the years 1985 and 1995. To still in its infancy, Politovich said, relying mainly on improve forecasts, MacDonald said, faster computers Report of the Committee on Professional Standards and Practices in Meteorology for 1942 Two cases have been considered by the committee during 1942. This report has to do with the general principles involved. The names of the people involved will be furnished to anyone who should have the information. The first case was that of a youn g meteorologist who was writing a book on weather for pilots. He is a member of the American Meteorological Society and wished to use that fact in the preface of the book and probably later for advertising purposes. This did not seem a wise practice. A good author and a good book do not need to mention membership. In the case of others it must be remembered that membership is very easy to gain. It involves nothing but interest and some connection with meteorology. To play up prominently membership might give the misleading impression that the American Meteorological Society was sponsoring or endorsing what he had written. The second case wa s that of a popularly known person who gave a course on meteorology under educational or academic auspices. In the first place promises were held out to those taking the course that certain positions in the Army or Navy or the Weather Bureau could be obtained by taking this course with no other qualifications. These false promises were later retracted and that part of the situation was rectified. This person also makes long range weather predictions for a year or more ahead for private gain and by methods which are not published or are known to be useless. This committee most decidedly takes the stand that no academic or educational institution should employ a person as meteorological instructor who lacks proved knowledge in the fundamentals of the science or who turns the public need for long range weather forecasts to private profit by selling predictions based upon methods kept secret from the profession or known to be useless.—Willis I. Milham, Chairman, D. M. Little, J. J. George. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 24, 73-74. 262 Vol. 74,, No. 2, February 1993

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Feb 1, 1993

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