50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO project "Light Intensity Fluctuations of the Night 100/000 Feet Reached by a British Sky." He also received the preprint volume Eighth Sounding Balloon Conference on Satellite Meteorology (1996). Koo designed, constructed, and field tested a hand- held photometer to observe the light intensity fluctua- A British meteorological sounding balloon tions of the clear night sky. He documented a fixed area with radiosonde and radar target recently reached field through a series of photographs from both a a height of 100,000 ft. It was school roof and by low flying aircraft. He created 2D launched at Larkhill, Wiltshire, and 3D models of light intensity from the photometer and recovered at Dorking in and photograph readings. These models were con- Surrey. It passed out of radar trasted with each other and numerically analyzed us- range at 84,000 ft, but there is no ing image processing software. Koo noted changes doubt that it reached a height of with the effect of environmental and seasonal factors at least 100,000 ft. In the past, such as snow cover. it has been extremely unusual for balloons of this type to reach Third-Plac e Award: Janna Kay heights of more than 60,000 or 70,000 ft, al- Jensen, 17, a senior at Roy High though later types of balloons recently flown with School, Roy, Utah, received the AMS recording instruments have reached heights of third-place award of $250 and the pre- 70,000 to 90,000 ft. Recent improvements in bal- print volume Third Conference on At- loon material make a plan of development pos- mospheric Chemistry. Jensen's project "Pollution sible which may eventually result in regular as- Hazards—Measured pH Differentials Due to Geologi- cents to 100,000 ft. [In U.S. new sounding bal- cal, Meteorological, and Human Induced Factors: loons of the USAF are also regularly reaching Phase IV" explored the topic of atmospheric optics. about 95,000 ft at White Sands, N. Mex.; many Jensen set up a network of 10 rainwater collection ascents have reached over 100,000, one to sites across Utah to study acid precipitation in the state. 114,000. Also on Aug. 8, 1947, a cluster of 4 bal- These sites were distributed across rural, urban, and loons carrying Geiger counters was sent up by wilderness areas for linkage with anthropomorphic the Bartol Foundation of Philadelphia to 127,000 caused pollution. She evaluated 168 weekly precipi- feet.—R. G. S.] The problem involved is two- tation samples collected among the sites throughout fold: first, the balloon must be flexible enough 1995/96. Following her pH testing of the rainwater to stand the high degree of stretching brought samples, Jensen was able to map acid precipitation about by the great decrease in atmospheric pres- concentrations and occurrence frequency. She com- sure at these heights and also to resist the very pared her data with the distribution of known indus- low temperature. The second major part of the trial sites, population concentrations, and local clima- problem is to make the instruments suitable for tological wind data records for possible correlations.* measuring pressure and temperature in a region where pressure is only about one-sixtieth of that at ground level, of sufficient size and weight to enable them to be carried by a reasonably small balloon. (—From Aeroplane, Aug. 8.) {DITO M NOT* Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 28,464. The Bulletin relies on its readership for timely information on local science fair judging and results. • Local Science Fair Results K 4 Submit contributions from 1998 science fairs to the Bulle- tin, AMS, 45 Beacon St., Boston, MA 02108-3693; fax 617-742-8718; e-mail: jburba@ametsoc.org. y \ Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2755 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

50 YEARS AGO

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Abstract

project "Light Intensity Fluctuations of the Night 100/000 Feet Reached by a British Sky." He also received the preprint volume Eighth Sounding Balloon Conference on Satellite Meteorology (1996). Koo designed, constructed, and field tested a hand- held photometer to observe the light intensity fluctua- A British meteorological sounding balloon tions of the clear night sky. He documented a fixed area with radiosonde and radar target recently reached field through a series of photographs from both a a height of 100,000 ft. It was school roof and by low flying aircraft. He created 2D launched at Larkhill, Wiltshire, and 3D models of light intensity from the photometer and recovered at Dorking in and photograph readings. These models were con- Surrey. It passed out of radar trasted with each other and numerically analyzed us- range at 84,000 ft, but there is no ing image processing software. Koo noted changes doubt that it reached a height of with the effect of environmental and seasonal factors at least 100,000 ft. In the past, such as snow cover. it has been extremely unusual for balloons of this type to reach Third-Plac e Award: Janna Kay heights of more than 60,000 or 70,000 ft, al- Jensen, 17, a senior at Roy High though later types of balloons recently flown with School, Roy, Utah, received the AMS recording instruments have reached heights of third-place award of $250 and the pre- 70,000 to 90,000 ft. Recent improvements in bal- print volume Third Conference on At- loon material make a plan of development pos- mospheric Chemistry. Jensen's project "Pollution sible which may eventually result in regular as- Hazards—Measured pH Differentials Due to Geologi- cents to 100,000 ft. [In U.S. new sounding bal- cal, Meteorological, and Human Induced Factors: loons of the USAF are also regularly reaching Phase IV" explored the topic of atmospheric optics. about 95,000 ft at White Sands, N. Mex.; many Jensen set up a network of 10 rainwater collection ascents have reached over 100,000, one to sites across Utah to study acid precipitation in the state. 114,000. Also on Aug. 8, 1947, a cluster of 4 bal- These sites were distributed across rural, urban, and loons carrying Geiger counters was sent up by wilderness areas for linkage with anthropomorphic the Bartol Foundation of Philadelphia to 127,000 caused pollution. She evaluated 168 weekly precipi- feet.—R. G. S.] The problem involved is two- tation samples collected among the sites throughout fold: first, the balloon must be flexible enough 1995/96. Following her pH testing of the rainwater to stand the high degree of stretching brought samples, Jensen was able to map acid precipitation about by the great decrease in atmospheric pres- concentrations and occurrence frequency. She com- sure at these heights and also to resist the very pared her data with the distribution of known indus- low temperature. The second major part of the trial sites, population concentrations, and local clima- problem is to make the instruments suitable for tological wind data records for possible correlations.* measuring pressure and temperature in a region where pressure is only about one-sixtieth of that at ground level, of sufficient size and weight to enable them to be carried by a reasonably small balloon. (—From Aeroplane, Aug. 8.) {DITO M NOT* Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 28,464. The Bulletin relies on its readership for timely information on local science fair judging and results. • Local Science Fair Results K 4 Submit contributions from 1998 science fairs to the Bulle- tin, AMS, 45 Beacon St., Boston, MA 02108-3693; fax 617-742-8718; e-mail: jburba@ametsoc.org. y \ Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2755

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Dec 1, 1997

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