50 years ago

50 years ago 25 iie&A * Newspaper Weather Maps Return Before the war, weather maps were published in daily newspapers in various cities. Then all had to be cut out. Beginning when the restrictions on weather TheAMS's second oldest scholarship, first awarded reports were largely eased, the New York Times and in 1973, is the Howard H. Hanks Jr. Scholarship in some other pa- Meteorology, funding for which was provided by the pers in large met- Weather Corporation of America. Hanks was killed ropolita n areas age 41 and his necrology appeared in the December have published a 1969 Bulletin. It follows below. simplifie d daily weather map. The Howard Harvey Hanks Jr. Providence Jour- 1928-1969 nal has now started on a good scale nearly 6" wide showing the weather at 5:30 p.m. The New York Howard H. Hanks, Jr., meteorologist with Weather Times map is for 8:30 p.m. With the Washington Daily Corporation of America, St. Louis, Mo., died in the Weather Map being published for 2:30 a.m. we now collision of a commercial airliner and a private aircraft have available in printed form daily the maps for at near Indianapolis, Ind., September 9,1969. Mr. Hanks least three synoptic hours.—C.F.B. was completing a business trip and returning from Cincinnati, Ohio. Born in Reedley, Calif., Mr. Hanks joined the Air Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 25,410. Force in 1946 and served as weather observer and rawinsonde operator until 1949. He then entered Oklahoma State University and after two years trans- ferred to Florida State University, where he received a B.S. in meteorology in 1953 and an M.S. in meteo- rology in 1955. He then became a Weather Bureau meteorologist at Wichita and Kansas City, doing re- search in the Severe Local Storms Center and serving CMOM in the Kansas City Severe Storm Forecast unit. He joined Midwest Weather Service in 1958 in Kansas SOURCEBOOK City and was engaged in industrial weather forecast- ing, research on applied meteorological problems, and radio and television weathercasting. He was one of the original members of Midwest Service and was also an instructor in meteorology at the University of Kansas. He transferred to Weather Corporation of America in 1968, serving as vice president with capa- bility and with usual devotion to his work. Mr. Hanks joined the American Meteorological Society in 1954 and was one of the few Certified Consulting Meteorologists to hold both the radio and television Seals of Approval. He also served on the board of industrial meteorology. Survivors include his wife Jean; daughters, Valerie and Pamela; parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Hanks, Sr.; brothers, Paul, John, Richard and James; and sister, Mrs. Lloyd Stogsdill.—Eugene C. Grueber. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 50,955. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2269 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-75.12.2357b
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Abstract

25 iie&A * Newspaper Weather Maps Return Before the war, weather maps were published in daily newspapers in various cities. Then all had to be cut out. Beginning when the restrictions on weather TheAMS's second oldest scholarship, first awarded reports were largely eased, the New York Times and in 1973, is the Howard H. Hanks Jr. Scholarship in some other pa- Meteorology, funding for which was provided by the pers in large met- Weather Corporation of America. Hanks was killed ropolita n areas age 41 and his necrology appeared in the December have published a 1969 Bulletin. It follows below. simplifie d daily weather map. The Howard Harvey Hanks Jr. Providence Jour- 1928-1969 nal has now started on a good scale nearly 6" wide showing the weather at 5:30 p.m. The New York Howard H. Hanks, Jr., meteorologist with Weather Times map is for 8:30 p.m. With the Washington Daily Corporation of America, St. Louis, Mo., died in the Weather Map being published for 2:30 a.m. we now collision of a commercial airliner and a private aircraft have available in printed form daily the maps for at near Indianapolis, Ind., September 9,1969. Mr. Hanks least three synoptic hours.—C.F.B. was completing a business trip and returning from Cincinnati, Ohio. Born in Reedley, Calif., Mr. Hanks joined the Air Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 25,410. Force in 1946 and served as weather observer and rawinsonde operator until 1949. He then entered Oklahoma State University and after two years trans- ferred to Florida State University, where he received a B.S. in meteorology in 1953 and an M.S. in meteo- rology in 1955. He then became a Weather Bureau meteorologist at Wichita and Kansas City, doing re- search in the Severe Local Storms Center and serving CMOM in the Kansas City Severe Storm Forecast unit. He joined Midwest Weather Service in 1958 in Kansas SOURCEBOOK City and was engaged in industrial weather forecast- ing, research on applied meteorological problems, and radio and television weathercasting. He was one of the original members of Midwest Service and was also an instructor in meteorology at the University of Kansas. He transferred to Weather Corporation of America in 1968, serving as vice president with capa- bility and with usual devotion to his work. Mr. Hanks joined the American Meteorological Society in 1954 and was one of the few Certified Consulting Meteorologists to hold both the radio and television Seals of Approval. He also served on the board of industrial meteorology. Survivors include his wife Jean; daughters, Valerie and Pamela; parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Hanks, Sr.; brothers, Paul, John, Richard and James; and sister, Mrs. Lloyd Stogsdill.—Eugene C. Grueber. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 50,955. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2269

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Dec 1, 1994

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