50 YEARS AGO

50 YEARS AGO Chicago time data is available using specially developed software (StormWatch) on a stand-alone PC in a United Airlines was the host of the 7 April 1998 Windows95 environment. Data are received via a meeting. Carl Knable, manager of meteorology, specially tuned antenna through a receiver-decoder gave a talk on the function of the Weather Center box. Omni-Weather is also the archive/database in United's Operations Control Center (OCC). Staff custodian of the climatic records. This system is meteorologists Joel Gibson and Dave Kleckner currently in use with civil preparedness operations assisted with tours of the OCC and a demonstra- and utilities, and as a weather display tool for mo- tion of the new technology being employed. bile HAZMAT. Knable also gave a special welcome to retired me- teorologist Dan O'Keefe and his wife, Janis. The speaker for the evening was Michael Hern O'Keef e was one of the original meteorologists from the Colorado Department of Transportation. hired by United when it first opened a meteorol- Hern is the supervisor of maintenance. His presen- ogy department in 1937. tation focused on the test results of salt and sand mixtures presently in use across the state. Magne- Knable talked about new projects involving the sium chloride, or mag-chloride as it is often called, department, particularly work involving United, the is currently undergoing road tests in the Colorado Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Springs area. Road sensors, called pucks, report sur- National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) face temperature, deep temperature, and salt solu- at developing improved turbulence detection and tion concentrations. This information lets the forecasting. Using real-time information down- maintainers know when a salted roadway becomes linked from United aircraft, NCAR is working to diluted and needs another treatment, and when to develop aircraft specific algorithms, which would apply the first treatment. provide a more consistent picture of turbulence Chapter elections and a vote on the constitution events. Another major benefit would be the sub- rounded out the evening's affairs.—Jon Cornick. stantial increase in reports available by using air- craft data as a supplement to the current method of pilot reports. With just a few year's interval since the chapter's last tour of the United facility, it was quite obvious Airline Meteorologists Unionize that the rapid advancement in computer technol- ogy has provided an opportunity for greatly im- proved integration of the operational needs of the On October 27, 1947, the airline. Kleckner demonstrated the ASD/Wx work- National Mediation Board deter- station, a Unix-based computer network designed || | I I mined after a hearing that me- to integrate both weather and operational computer teorologists would thereafter be systems into one workstation. Integrating world- treated as a separate class or wide satellite coverage, Doppler radar, lightning craft under the Railway Labor data, and both FAA and NWS data feeds, the sys- Act. The Brotherhood of Rail- tem makes worldwide weather information avail- way Clerks had unsuccessfully able throughout the OCC. The ability to indepen- opposed this decision. A new and independent dently customize the workstations and data displays organization, the Society of Airline Meteorolo- to individual user needs and preferences allows for gists, now represents these employees on a complete and efficient dissemination of weather United Air Lines and has just won an election data throughout the OCC and subsequently to sta- at Braniff Airlines. Another independent union tions and flight crews.—Dave Kleckner and Bob represents meteorologists at PAA, while Broth- Hajek. • erhood of Railway Clerks represents them at Mid-Continental Airlines. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 29, 297. 1142 Vol. 79 , No. 6, June 1998 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
eISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-79.6.1142
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Abstract

Chicago time data is available using specially developed software (StormWatch) on a stand-alone PC in a United Airlines was the host of the 7 April 1998 Windows95 environment. Data are received via a meeting. Carl Knable, manager of meteorology, specially tuned antenna through a receiver-decoder gave a talk on the function of the Weather Center box. Omni-Weather is also the archive/database in United's Operations Control Center (OCC). Staff custodian of the climatic records. This system is meteorologists Joel Gibson and Dave Kleckner currently in use with civil preparedness operations assisted with tours of the OCC and a demonstra- and utilities, and as a weather display tool for mo- tion of the new technology being employed. bile HAZMAT. Knable also gave a special welcome to retired me- teorologist Dan O'Keefe and his wife, Janis. The speaker for the evening was Michael Hern O'Keef e was one of the original meteorologists from the Colorado Department of Transportation. hired by United when it first opened a meteorol- Hern is the supervisor of maintenance. His presen- ogy department in 1937. tation focused on the test results of salt and sand mixtures presently in use across the state. Magne- Knable talked about new projects involving the sium chloride, or mag-chloride as it is often called, department, particularly work involving United, the is currently undergoing road tests in the Colorado Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Springs area. Road sensors, called pucks, report sur- National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) face temperature, deep temperature, and salt solu- at developing improved turbulence detection and tion concentrations. This information lets the forecasting. Using real-time information down- maintainers know when a salted roadway becomes linked from United aircraft, NCAR is working to diluted and needs another treatment, and when to develop aircraft specific algorithms, which would apply the first treatment. provide a more consistent picture of turbulence Chapter elections and a vote on the constitution events. Another major benefit would be the sub- rounded out the evening's affairs.—Jon Cornick. stantial increase in reports available by using air- craft data as a supplement to the current method of pilot reports. With just a few year's interval since the chapter's last tour of the United facility, it was quite obvious Airline Meteorologists Unionize that the rapid advancement in computer technol- ogy has provided an opportunity for greatly im- proved integration of the operational needs of the On October 27, 1947, the airline. Kleckner demonstrated the ASD/Wx work- National Mediation Board deter- station, a Unix-based computer network designed || | I I mined after a hearing that me- to integrate both weather and operational computer teorologists would thereafter be systems into one workstation. Integrating world- treated as a separate class or wide satellite coverage, Doppler radar, lightning craft under the Railway Labor data, and both FAA and NWS data feeds, the sys- Act. The Brotherhood of Rail- tem makes worldwide weather information avail- way Clerks had unsuccessfully able throughout the OCC. The ability to indepen- opposed this decision. A new and independent dently customize the workstations and data displays organization, the Society of Airline Meteorolo- to individual user needs and preferences allows for gists, now represents these employees on a complete and efficient dissemination of weather United Air Lines and has just won an election data throughout the OCC and subsequently to sta- at Braniff Airlines. Another independent union tions and flight crews.—Dave Kleckner and Bob represents meteorologists at PAA, while Broth- Hajek. • erhood of Railway Clerks represents them at Mid-Continental Airlines. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 29, 297. 1142 Vol. 79 , No. 6, June 1998

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 1, 1998

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