50 years ago

50 years ago Hampton Roads schemes used by several coupled meteorological The elections for 1993/94 chapter officers were systems. held on 19 May 1993. Officers elected were Ronald E. At the May 1993 meeting, Dave Knapp made a presentation on the analysis of tornadicthunderstorms Johnson, president; Le Roy Dennison, first vice presi- and lightning profiles. Knapp displayed results of re- dent; RandyJ.Scanlon, second vice president; Patrick search using data from the National Lightning Detec- Dixon, treasurer; and Robert Mazaitis, secretary. tion Network. He displayed a lightning profile from Positively Strike Dominated (PSD) thunderstorms that Western New York were strongly correlated to tornadic activity. The season's fifth meeting was held on 17 February at the Ferguson Planetarium at Buffalo State College. At the conclusion of the 1992/93 year, the chapter Art Gielow presented the program "The Winter Sky." held elections for officers for the 1993/94 year. Offic- ers elected were Richard Szymber, president; Lou The 25 in attendance also participated in a discussion Luces, vice president; and Ralph Steinhoff, secretary- of the current weather situation, with meteorologists treasurer. Ken Remington and Steve McLaughlin presenting the latest NMC guidance from earlier in the day. Greater Milwaukee Thirty members were in attendance at the 24 March meeting at SUNY—Buffalo as Charles H. V. Ebert of Marc Kavinsky, meteorologist intern with the Na- tional Weather Service, presented "Career Choices SUNY's Geography Department gave a lecture and for the Operational Meteorologist" at the 4 May meet- slide show entitled "Planet Earth—The Beginning— ing that was attended by 70 people. The presentation Evolution of Oceans and Atmospheres." Ebert pre- was directed toward the meteorology undergraduate sented the latest theories on the origins of the earth and oceans. It was the sixth consecutive year that the or recent graduate with a desire for a career in opera- chapter had Ebert as a guest speaker. tional forecasting. Several members of the local media were in atten- Some 20 members were in attendance on 25 Feb- dance since they had participated in Kavinsky's re- ruary for a public hearing at Erie County Hall in Buffalo search. on the proposed siting of the Weather Service Doppler Kavinsky began with an overview of the types of Radar at the Buffalo Airport. Their voices added to the organizations that participated in his research and overwhelming support evident at the meeting. Don their response rate. He said that he sent informational Wuerch, meteorologist in charge of the Buffalo Weather Office, explained the benefits of the new radar in surveys to a random sampling of National Weather providing timely warnings for western New York and Service forecast offices and television stations across expressed concern over the ability of the current aging the central United States. He also sent surveys to most of the private weather consulting firms and airlines radar system (30 years) to keep operating much across the nation that employ operational meteorolo- longer. He also addressed several questions and gists. concerns over possible harmful effects to health from the new radar. Several TV meteorologists, media He summarized the information of organizations' personalities, and civil defense agency representa- mission of focus, the types of services offered and tives also spoke in support of the new system. clients served, and the employee makeup of the four different types of organizations. The 14 May meeting was held outdoors at a Buffalo Kavinsky discussed the preferred education, skills, Bisons (AAA) baseball game at Pilot Field in Buffalo. and experience levels desired by companies. He The 12th annual picnic held in a county park on 5 described a typical workday and the amount of time June served as the final chapter meeting. Approximately allotted for assigned responsibilities. 35 members and guests attended the all-day event. Job benefits, including vacation and insurance, The chapter's 1993/94 season will begin in Sep- offered by organizations seemed to be of special tember 1993. • interest to meteorology students. Kavinsky presented data that summarized the average salary expected at each type of organization for a newly hired meteorolo- gist, average salary after 5 years experience, and after 10 years. Kavinsky discussed the perceived differences be- tween the respondents from the National Weather Editor's note: From 1938 to 1957, there was no Service and private forecast services. Some interest- July issue of the Bulletin. ing points were made for each side. 1406 Vol. 74, No. 7, July 1993 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

Hampton Roads schemes used by several coupled meteorological The elections for 1993/94 chapter officers were systems. held on 19 May 1993. Officers elected were Ronald E. At the May 1993 meeting, Dave Knapp made a presentation on the analysis of tornadicthunderstorms Johnson, president; Le Roy Dennison, first vice presi- and lightning profiles. Knapp displayed results of re- dent; RandyJ.Scanlon, second vice president; Patrick search using data from the National Lightning Detec- Dixon, treasurer; and Robert Mazaitis, secretary. tion Network. He displayed a lightning profile from Positively Strike Dominated (PSD) thunderstorms that Western New York were strongly correlated to tornadic activity. The season's fifth meeting was held on 17 February at the Ferguson Planetarium at Buffalo State College. At the conclusion of the 1992/93 year, the chapter Art Gielow presented the program "The Winter Sky." held elections for officers for the 1993/94 year. Offic- ers elected were Richard Szymber, president; Lou The 25 in attendance also participated in a discussion Luces, vice president; and Ralph Steinhoff, secretary- of the current weather situation, with meteorologists treasurer. Ken Remington and Steve McLaughlin presenting the latest NMC guidance from earlier in the day. Greater Milwaukee Thirty members were in attendance at the 24 March meeting at SUNY—Buffalo as Charles H. V. Ebert of Marc Kavinsky, meteorologist intern with the Na- tional Weather Service, presented "Career Choices SUNY's Geography Department gave a lecture and for the Operational Meteorologist" at the 4 May meet- slide show entitled "Planet Earth—The Beginning— ing that was attended by 70 people. The presentation Evolution of Oceans and Atmospheres." Ebert pre- was directed toward the meteorology undergraduate sented the latest theories on the origins of the earth and oceans. It was the sixth consecutive year that the or recent graduate with a desire for a career in opera- chapter had Ebert as a guest speaker. tional forecasting. Several members of the local media were in atten- Some 20 members were in attendance on 25 Feb- dance since they had participated in Kavinsky's re- ruary for a public hearing at Erie County Hall in Buffalo search. on the proposed siting of the Weather Service Doppler Kavinsky began with an overview of the types of Radar at the Buffalo Airport. Their voices added to the organizations that participated in his research and overwhelming support evident at the meeting. Don their response rate. He said that he sent informational Wuerch, meteorologist in charge of the Buffalo Weather Office, explained the benefits of the new radar in surveys to a random sampling of National Weather providing timely warnings for western New York and Service forecast offices and television stations across expressed concern over the ability of the current aging the central United States. He also sent surveys to most of the private weather consulting firms and airlines radar system (30 years) to keep operating much across the nation that employ operational meteorolo- longer. He also addressed several questions and gists. concerns over possible harmful effects to health from the new radar. Several TV meteorologists, media He summarized the information of organizations' personalities, and civil defense agency representa- mission of focus, the types of services offered and tives also spoke in support of the new system. clients served, and the employee makeup of the four different types of organizations. The 14 May meeting was held outdoors at a Buffalo Kavinsky discussed the preferred education, skills, Bisons (AAA) baseball game at Pilot Field in Buffalo. and experience levels desired by companies. He The 12th annual picnic held in a county park on 5 described a typical workday and the amount of time June served as the final chapter meeting. Approximately allotted for assigned responsibilities. 35 members and guests attended the all-day event. Job benefits, including vacation and insurance, The chapter's 1993/94 season will begin in Sep- offered by organizations seemed to be of special tember 1993. • interest to meteorology students. Kavinsky presented data that summarized the average salary expected at each type of organization for a newly hired meteorolo- gist, average salary after 5 years experience, and after 10 years. Kavinsky discussed the perceived differences be- tween the respondents from the National Weather Editor's note: From 1938 to 1957, there was no Service and private forecast services. Some interest- July issue of the Bulletin. ing points were made for each side. 1406 Vol. 74, No. 7, July 1993

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jul 1, 1993

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